EAD 965: Diversity & Equity in Postsecondary Education

Higher, Adult, & Lifelong Education

Michigan State University

 

Spring 2005

 

Dr. Kristen Renn                                                                    

428 Erickson Hall                                                                        

353-5979 (office)                                                                   

349-0797 (home)                                                                   

email: renn@msu.edu                                                                         

                                                                                                           

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES

 

EAD965: Diversity & Equity in Postsecondary Education addresses historical, contemporary, and research aspects of three major areas related to diversity and equity in postsecondary education: Access and Participation, Campus Climate and Curriculum, and Outcomes. Within these three areas, the course is designed to introduce students to information, concepts, policies, and controversies related to gender, racial, ethnic, sexual orientation, socio-economic, ability, and religious differences among students, faculty, administrators, and other employees in postsecondary settings. An emphasis is placed on critical reading, writing, and class participation. The successful student in this course will be able to describe and analyze historical and contemporary issues related to diversity and equity, as well as discuss current trends and coming challenges in educational research, theory, policy, and practice.

 

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS

 

Smith, W.A., Altbach, P.G., & Lomotey, K. (Eds.). (2002). The racial crisis in American higher education: Continuing challenges for the Twenty-first century. Albany: State University of New York Press.

 

Martínez Alemán, A.M., & Renn, K.A. (2002). Women in higher education: An encyclopedia. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

 

Turner, C.S., Antonio, A.L., García, M., Laden, B.V., Nora, A., & Presley, C.L. (2002). Racial and ethnic diversity in higher education. ASHE Reader Series. Boston: Pearson Custom Publishing.

 

Additional readings (marked with *) have been scanned into PDF files, with URLs indicated on syllabus. Note also that some readings (marked with +) are available in full-text online. In either case, you are expected to locate and print your own copy.

 

 

 

(STRONGLY) RECOMMENDED FOR YOUR BOOKSHELF

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). 2001. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

 

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCE

 

If you do not have ready access to the Chronicle of Higher Education, you may want to consider getting your own subscription. If you already subscribe but do not receive the daily electronic news updates, you may want to activate this service now (it is free to Chronicle subscribers; go to the website to get instructions on how to get the daily news service).

 

The Chronicle maintains an excellent website that is free whether or not you subscribe to their newspaper. Some of its links are restricted to Chronicle subscribers, but most are not.

 

 

USEFUL/INTERESTING WEBSITES

 

www.apastyle.org/index.html (APA style manual home page)

www.acenet.edu (American Council on Education)

www.naspa.org (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators)

www. myacpa.org (Association of College Personnel Administrators)

www. chronicle.com (The Chronicle of Higher Education)

www.aahe.org (American Association for Higher Education)

www.ashe.missouri.edu (Association for the Study of Higher Education)

www.aera.net/divisions/j (Division J: Postsecondary Education of the American Educational Research Association)

www.Studentaffairs.com (a private site with excellent links, including instructions to sign up for listservs related to student affairs)

www.Higher-Ed.org (a private higher ed resource site; links to many useful and interesting higher ed sites)

 

 

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: ASSIGNMENTS AND EVALUATION

 

There are three non-negotiable elements of the course, worth 25% of the course grade. The other 75% come from three categories – written, oral, and electronic – and you will be able to “mix and match” from these categories to create a set of graded activities that will best allow you to meet your intellectual goals for the course.

 

The three non-negotiable elements are:

 

1.  Readings and topical assignments.

You should come to class ready to discuss all readings. Although it is not required, some students find it helpful to prepare questions or comments on each reading.

Periodically I will assign an exercise or other preparation to be done prior to the next class session. These assignments will form the basis of class discussion and group work. Because readings and topical assignments are critical to active class participation, your grade in this area will be reflected in your participation grade.

 

2.  Active participation in class discussions. (15%)

Active participation requires attendance, preparation (through readings and topical assignments), and willingness to contribute to discussions in a variety of group configurations (pairs, small groups, entire class, etc.). After the first occurence, absence from any class will result in a deduction in your grade in this area, at a rate of 1 percentage point for any session missed in whole or in part.

 

3. Three short essays reflecting on your goals for yourself and the course (1-2 pages each). (10%)

-Essay I: Self and course objectives: Due in class 1/19.

-Essay II: Midsemester self and course evaluation: Due in class 2/23.

-Essay III: End of semester self and course evaluation: Due in class 5/4.

Note: These essays are ungraded (i.e., treated on a credit/no credit basis) and may take alternative forms, such as bulleted lists.

 

 

Then, from the following three lists (written, oral, electronic), choose another 75 points. You must choose at least one from the written and oral lists and you must commit to 75 points, but are otherwise free to choose whatever combination best suits your needs. If the math doesn’t quite work on the combination you would like to pursue, propose a rounding up or down of a few points to get to 75 total. I would be happy to consult with you if you are unsure how you would like to distribute your points. I will ask you to bring your proposed plan on 1/19 and to lock in your commitment by 1/26.

 

WRITTEN (choose at least one)

 

• Research paper (50 pts)

A 17-20 page research paper on a topic you select and to which I agree.  The paper is due in stages as outlined below.

• A workable topic with a brief description (not to exceed one page) is due on January 26. Topics must be related to issues of diversity and/or equity in postsecondary education. They may focus on any postsecondary sector(s) (e.g., community colleges, four-year institutions, research institutions; public, private, non-sectarian, for profit, religiously-affiliated, etc.) and/or on any population within higher education (e.g., students, faculty, administrators, other employees; groups by gender, race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, ability, etc.). They may address access, participation, policy, campus climate, curriculum, teaching and learning, history, or another area of importance in higher education.

• A list of probable sources is due on March 16. Sources may include journal articles, books, book chapters, websites (be careful of credibility), popular media (also be careful of credibility), and others. You can organize this list by topic (e.g., background information, current data, conflicting viewpoints, trends, predictions, etc.) or some other means (alphabetically, by type of source, etc.). You should have at least 15 sources in this preliminary list; you can add additional sources for the final document, and you may decide not to include some from this preliminary list. Please indicate your topic at the top of your list of probable sources.

• Complete paper is due on April 20. Papers should be 17-20 pages of text (excluding cover page and reference list).

 

  Literature review (50 pts)

A literature review of at least 17 pages on a topic you select and to which I agree.  The review is due in stages as outlined below.

• A workable topic with a brief description (not to exceed one page) is due on January 26 Topics must be related to issues of diversity and/or equity in postsecondary education. They may focus on any postsecondary sector(s) (e.g., community colleges, four-year institutions, research institutions; public, private, non-sectarian, for profit, religiously-affiliated, etc.) and/or on any population within higher education (e.g., students, faculty, administrators, other employees; groups by gender, race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, ability, etc.). They may address access, participation, policy, campus climate, curriculum, teaching and learning, history, or another area of importance in higher education.  Your literature review should make a claim about the literature, synthesize across sources (i.e., be more than just a series of book-report style accounts of the articles you found), and include an assessment of the literature on the topic, concluding with recommendations for additional research.

• A list of probable sources is due on March 16. Sources may include journal articles, books, book chapters, websites (be careful of credibility), popular media (also be careful of credibility), and others. You can organize this list by topic (e.g., background information, current data, conflicting viewpoints, trends, predictions, etc.) or some other means (alphabetically, by type of source, etc.). You should have at least 15 sources in this preliminary list; you can add additional sources for the final document, and you may decide not to include some from this preliminary list. Please indicate your topic at the top of your list of probable sources.

• Complete review is due on April 20. Papers should be 17-20 pages of text (excluding cover page and reference list).

 

• Take home mid-term and/or final examinations (10 pts per question answered, up to 30 pts)

Each exam is a take home, open book exam, consisting of a number of questions. For each question you choose to answer, you will write an essay of 5-6 pages length. Questions will call on you to integrate and synthesize material from the course, citing appropriate sources to support your arguments. You will have access to the questions for the mid-term on February 23 and the exam will be due on March 2; you will receive question for the final on April 20 and the exam will be due on April 27.

 

  Issue papers (10 pts each, up to 30 pts)

From the Chronicle of Higher Education choose a story related to diversity and/or equity in higher education. Write a 4-5 page essay about the topic in which you summarize the topic, its importance, and the key points (pro/con) and players (institutional, state, or federal policy makers; students; legislators; etc.) involved.  Include at least three additional sources from the course readings or elsewhere to support your claims. Issue papers are due on or before April 6.

 

  Book reviews (10 pts each, up to 30 pts)

Choose a book related to the topic of diversity and equity. Write a 800-1000 word book review of the sort that would appear in a journal. Briefly summarize the content, clearly articulate the book’s connection to issues of diversity and equity in higher education, relate it to other relevant literature, and point out its strengths and weaknesses. If you need examples of what a book review should look like, see the Review of Higher Education or the Journal of Higher Education. Book reviews are due on or before April 6.

 

 

ORAL (choose at least one)

 

 • Lead a class session (10-15 pts , you choose the amount). Note: can only choose this activity once (solo or partnered) on the dates that are asterisked in the course schedule

Sign up for a date to lead or co-lead a class session. After reading the texts for that session, plan a 90 minute activity (or activities) to cover the main points of some or all of the readings. By the class session before the one on which you will lead, email to me an outline of your plans.

 

• Presentation of your research paper or lit review (10-15 pts, you choose the amount)

Plan and present a 10 minute summary of the most important points of your paper or lit review. You can use any presentation media you choose (I’ll need to know at least one week in advance of any AV equipment needs you may have). Presentations will be 4/27.

ELECTRONIC (an option, but not required)

 

 • Diversity/Equity resources web site (25-50 pts, you choose the amount)

• A workable topic with a brief description (not to exceed one page) is due on January 26 Topics must be related to issues of diversity and/or equity in postsecondary education. They may focus on any postsecondary sector(s) (e.g., community colleges, four-year institutions, research institutions; public, private, non-sectarian, for profit, religiously-affiliated, etc.) and/or on any population within higher education (e.g., students, faculty, administrators, other employees; groups by gender, race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation, ability, etc.). They may address access, participation, policy, campus climate, curriculum, teaching and learning, history, or another area of importance in higher education.  In your proposal, identify the audience and/or intended “client” for your website and determine how extensive you plan to be (which will be related to the points total you choose – fewer points = less extensive; more points = more extensive)

• A map of your proposed website, with URLs and explanation as necessary, is due on March 16

• Complete website is due on April 20.

                                                                                   

 

 

In class, you will receive more explicit instructions for completing course assignments. Please ask if you have questions regarding how you will be evaluated in this course.

 

All papers should be double-spaced in 12-point Times font with margins of 1 inch. They should always fall within the page range listed in the syllabus.

                       

All citations and reference lists should conform to the style manual of the American Psychological Association (5th edition).

 

Note on absences and late assignments:

            Class attendance is required and is included in the class participation grade. Nevertheless, students may occasionally need to absent themselves from class meetings for reasons of illness, family, or work. In fairness to students who attend and participate in every class session, after the first occurrence, an absence for any reason other than those noted below will result in a reduction in the absent student’s class participation grade. This reduction is on the order of 1 point (of total for all assignments) per class missed. For example, if you miss one session but are otherwise present on time and actively contributing, you would receive 14 of the 15 possible points for participation (out of the 100 total points for the course). For the purposes of this policy, being late to class or leaving early for any reason constitutes an absence and will result in a 1 point reduction in accumulated points toward your final grade. Important note:  The participation grade is not merely a grade for attending class – participation credit is earned through active involvement in class discussions, small and large groups, and so forth.

            Whenever it is possible, advance notice of absences is appreciated. An email message or phone call to someone who will be in class (instructor or student) is generally adequate to keep us from worrying about you. If you were unable to contact someone prior to the missed class, please contact me as soon as possible afterwards to learn of any assignments, announcements, etc.

            Absence from class to observe a religious holiday, to serve jury duty, to participate in required military service, or to take comprehensive exams in your graduate program are exceptions to the above policy. If you anticipate being absent for any of these reasons, please make arrangements with me in advance and there will be no deduction in your grade.

            All assignments are expected during the session noted on the syllabus. Unless prior arrangements have been made with me, late submissions may not be accepted and may result in a grade of 0 for that assignment. Grades for late submissions that are accepted may be reduced.

 

Evaluation of assignments:

Assignments earning an “A” grade will be of excellent quality, reflecting critical thinking, creativity, and mastery of course material. They will be well organized and clear. They will be free of errors in syntax, grammar, and APA format. An “A-” grade might result from minor deductions in any of these areas.

 

Assignments earning a “B” grade will be of good quality, reflecting a solid grasp of the course material and clear, well-organized writing style. They might contain some errors in syntax, grammar, or APA format, but will not be seriously flawed. A “B-” grade might result from more significant reductions in these areas.

 

Assignments earning a “C” grade will be of acceptable quality, reflecting familiarity with course material. They might contain weaknesses in organization and errors in syntax, grammar, or APA format. A “C-” grade might result from more severe weaknesses.

 

Assignments earning below a “C-” are unacceptable and will receive no credit.

 

 

Course grades:

The grading system at MSU is on a four-point scale, with course grades reported in half points (4.0, 3.5, 3.0, 2.5, etc.). Any grade below a 3.0 is a sign of serious problems for continued graduate work and merits discussion with me and/or your academic advisor. For the purposes of assigning a final grade, the following table applies:

            94-100 points =           4.0

            88-93 points  =            3.5

            81-87 points =             3.0

            74-80 points =             2.5

            73 or fewer points =    0 (no credit for course)

 

 

A note for students with disabilities:

If you require any accommodation or services, please inform me or contact the Resource Center for Persons with Disabilities (www.msu.edu/unit/rcpd), 120 Bessey, 353-9642.

 

 

Additional MSU resources:

- The Graduate School (www.msu.edu/user/gradschl.), 118 Linton, 355-0301

- Learning Resources Center (www.msu.edu/unit/lrc), 209J Bessey, 355-2363

- Ombuds’ Office (www.msu.edu/unit/ombud), 129 North Kedzie, 353-8830

- Writing Center (http://writing.msu.edu), 300 Bessey, 432-3610

 

 


Course Schedule

 

[note: The majority of readings listed in this schedule are NOT presented in APA format – do not rely on this schedule for correct APA style.]

 

January 12                 Introduction and Course Overview

                                    What do we mean by “diversity” in higher education?

                                    What do we mean by “equity” in higher education?

                                   

ACCESS and PARTICIPATION

 

January 19                 Historical Overview of Access and Participation

 

Readings for today:

- *Anderson, G. (2002). Access. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 19-26). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

- * Coaxum, J. (2002). Equity. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 196-200). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

- Nidiffer, J. Overview to Historical and Cultural Contexts. Encyclopedia.

- Anderson, J.D. Race in American higher education: Historical perspectives on current conditions. Racial Crisis.

-*Ogren, C.A. (1999, November 19). Rethinking the “nontraditional” student from a historical perspective. Paper presented at the Association for the Study of Higher Education Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX. [ANGEL]

- Moreno, J.F. The elusive quest for equality: 150 years of Chicano/Chicana education. ASHE Reader.

- Nakanishi, D.T. Asian Pacific Americans and colleges and universities. ASHE Reader.

- Thompson, C.J. Historical origins of change: Implications for African Americans in higher education. ASHE Reader.

 

Assignment due: Essay I, self and course goals; Proposed course activities form

 

 

January 26                 Continue Historical Overview

 

Readings for today:

- Somers, P. Title IX. Encyclopedia.

- Micheletti, L.M. Coeducation. Encyclopedia.

- VanDerLinden, K. History of women in community colleges. Encyclopedia.

- Turk, D.B. Jewish students. Encyclopedia.

- Béjar, E.M. Hispanic-serving institutions. Encyclopedia.

- Béjar, E.M. Historically Black colleges and universities. Encyclopedia.

- Rousey, A. Tribal colleges and universities. Encyclopedia.      

- Jacobs, S. Military colleges. Encyclopedia.

- Wolf-Wendel, L.E. Women’s colleges. Encyclopedia.

- Teddlie, C., & Freeman, J.A. Twentieth-century desegregation in U.S. higher education: A review of five distinct historical eras. Racial Crisis.

- *Madaus, J.W. (2002). Services for college and university students with disabilities: A historical perspective. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 14 (1), 4-21. [ANGEL]

- +Dilley, P. (2002). 20th century postsecondary practices and policies to control gay students. Review of Higher Education, 25, 409-432. [locate online]

-*Benham, M.K.P. (2003). The journey of the Native American Higher Education Initiative and tribal colleges and universities.  In M.K.P. Benham & W.J. Stein (Eds.), The renaissance of American Indian higher education: Capturing the dream (pp. 3-24). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers. [ANGEL]

 

                                    Assignment due (for some): paper, lit review, or website topic

 

 

February 2                 Current Status of Access and Participation

 

Readings for today:

- Solmon, L.C., Solmon, M.S., & Schiff, T.W. The changing demographics: Problems and opportunities. Racial Crisis.

- +Sacks, P. (2003, July 25). Class rules: The fiction of egalitarian higher education. The Chronicle of Higher Education, B7-10. [locate and print]

- Olivas, M.A. Indian, Chicano, and Puerto Rican colleges: Status and issues. ASHE Reader.

- Bernal, E.M., Jalomo, R.E., & Nora, A. The relationship between race and socioeconomic status (SES): Implications for institutional research and admissions policies. ASHE Reader.

-*Ortiz, A.M., & HeavyRunner, I. (2003). Student access, retention, and success: Models of inclusion and support. In M.K.P. Benham & W.J. Stein (Eds.), The renaissance of American Indian higher education: Capturing the dream (pp. 215-240). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers. [ANGEL]

-+Horn, L., Berktold, J., Bobbitt, L. (June, 1999). Executive Summary, Introduction, Profile of Undergraduates with Disabilities, and Access to Postsecondary Education (pp. iii-vii and 1-36)  from Students with disabilities in postsecondary education: A profile of preparation, participation, and outcomes. National Center for Education Statistics Statistical Analysis Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Research and Improvement. [locate at: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=1999187]

 

Assignment: Pick an institution other than MSU (your undergraduate school, for example) and find out as much as you can about the demographic composition of the student, faculty, and administrative bodies. At a minimum, have data on student gender and race/ethnicity. Also locate this information for MSU, with as much detail as you can  (undergrad versus grad; in-state, out of state, international; etc). Be prepared to discuss in class. The IPEDS COOL data base may be helpful here (link from main NCES webpage http://www.nces.ed.gov).

 

Also:  Go to the Postsecondary Contexts section of the NCES Digest of Educational Statistics 2003 (at http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/), and read the summary. Then link to “characteristics of postsecondary students” from the summary page. Determine the gender breakdown of students at the type of institution you chose for the assignment above, and compare to the institution (i.e., if you chose a public, degree-granting 4-year institution, determine the % of men and of women enrolled nationally and compare to the institution you chose). Bring Table 32-1-a of the Digest with you to class (it is at http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2003/section5/tables/t32_1a.asp).

 

 

February 9                 Affirmative Action in Employment and Admissions

 

Readings for today:

- +Alger, J. (2003). Summary of Supreme Court decisions in admissions cases.  Ann Arbor: University of Michigan. Retrieve from http://www.umich.edu/~urel/admissions/overview/

- +Schmidt, P. (2003, July 4). Affirmative Action survives, and so does the debate. Chronicle of Higher Education, S1-S4.

OPTIONAL:

- +Text of Supreme Court’s opinions in Grutter v. Bollinger (the Law-School case). Available at http://chronicle.com/free/documents/v49/i43/grutter.pdf

- +Text of Supreme Court’s opinions in Gratz v. Bollinger (the undergraduate case). Available at http://chronicle.com/free/documents/v49/i43/gratz.pdf

[These are both rather large PDF files; you may choose to access the hard copy of the July 4, 2003 Chronicle, which includes the full text, or to use some other means of obtaining the full text of opinions for each case.]

 

In addition to first two readings above, read enough on the UM Affirmative Action website to be able to describe what the cases were about and what the implications of the decisions are. This may involve reading the text of the decisions and/or other supporting documents.

 

 

CAMPUS CLIMATE

 

February 16               Defining and Assessing Campus Climate

 

Readings for today:

- Cress, C.M. Campus climate. Encyclopedia.

- Hurtado, S., Milem, J.F., Clayton-Pedersen, A.R., & Allen, W.R. Enhancing campus climates for racial/ethnic diversity: Educational policy and practice. ASHE Reader.

- Feagin, J.R., Vera, H., & Imani, N. Educational choices and a university’s reputation: The importance of collective memory. Racial Crisis.

- *Allan, E.J. (2003). Constructing women’s status: Policy discourse of women’s commission reports. Harvard Educational Review, 73 (2). [ANGEL]

 

Assignment: Go to the resource page of the website of the National Consortium of LGBT Campus Resource Directors (http://www.lgbtcampus.org), then link to the summary of Warren Blumenfeld’s report “Making Colleges and Universities Safe for Gay and Lesbian Students.” Print and bring with you to class. Also note the

areas of campus climate suggested by the summary, choose an institution (MSU or elsewhere) and see how your chosen institution fares in at least three specific recommendations on the Summary. Then pick another category of diversity (gender, race/ethnicity, ability, etc) and see how the institution fares in regard to this category in the same recommendations.


* February 23            Climate Issues for Specific Groups (Race & Ethnicity)

 

Readings for today:

- Hurtado, S. Creating a climate of inclusion: Understanding Latina/o college students. Racial Crisis.

- Chang, M.J., & Kiang, P.N. New challenges of representing Asian American students in U.S. higher education. Racial Crisis or ASHE Reader.

- Brown, M.C., II. Ebony men in the ivory tower: A policy perspective. ASHE Reader.

- Allen, W.R., Epps, E.G., Guillory, E.A., Suh, S.A., Bonous-Hammarth, M., & Stassen, M.L.A. Outsiders within: Race, gender, and faculty status. Racial Crisis.

- Turner, C.S.V., & Myers, S.L., Jr. Snapshots from the literature: Elements influencing the workplace environment. ASHE Reader.

 

Choose one or more of these:

- King, K. African American women faculty. Encyclopedia.

- Johnson, B. American Indian women faculty. Encyclopedia.

- Calasanti, T., & Smith, J.W. Latina faculty. Encyclopedia.

- Bassett, R.M. Asian American women faculty. Encyclopedia.

 

Choose one of more of these:

- Woods, R.L. African American students. Encyclopedia.

- Geertz González, R. American Indian students. Encyclopedia.

- Bassett, R.M. Asian American students. Encyclopedia.

- Ortiz, S.J. Biracial and biethnic students. Encyclopedia.

- Yosso, T.J. Latina students. Encyclopedia.

 

And choose one of these:

- Villalpando, O., & Delgado Bernal, D. A critical race theory analysis of barriers that impede the success of faculty of color. Racial Crisis.

- Scheurich, J.J., & Young, M.D. White racism among White faculty: From critical understanding to antiracist activism. Racial Crisis.

 

Assignment due: Mid-semester self and course evaluation

 

Mid-term exam questions available today for those writing the exam

 

* March 2                  Climate Issues for Specific Groups (Gender)

 

Readings for today:

- Cooper, J. Overview of Women Faculty. Encyclopedia.

- Adair, V. Overview of Women and Higher Education Policy. Encyclopedia.

- Glazer-Raymo, J. Gender inequality. Encyclopedia.

- Allan, E.J. Classroom climate. Encyclopedia.                       

- Bonnette, C.M. (2000). Title IX basics. Indianapolis, IN: Good Sports, Inc., Title IX and Gender Equity Specialists. Retrieve from:

 

Mid-term exam due for those writing exam

 

 

 

March 9          BREAK

 

* March 16    Climate Issues, continued (Sexuality, Faith Tradition)

 

Readings for today:

- Talburt, S. Lesbian faculty. Encyclopedia.

- Tillery, S.M. Sexuality. Encyclopedia.

-+Dolan, J. (1998). Out on campus. Academe, 84 (5), 40-46. Retrieve through ProQuest.

-+Brauer, D. V. (2003). Dismantling the velvet-lined closet: The generational schism within LGBTQA campus communities. The Vermont Connection, 24, 99-110. Retrieve from

 

- +McMurtrie, B. (2001, November 9). For many Muslim students, college is a balancing act: Campus life consists of frequent conflicts and occasional compromises with secular culture. Chronicle of Higher Education, A55.

-+Lee, J.J. (2002). Changing worlds, changing selves: The experience of the religious self among Catholic collegians. Journal of College Student Development, 43, 341-356. [locate and print]

-+Constantine, M.G., Wilton, L., Gainor, K.A., & Lewis, E.L. (2002). Religious participation, spirituality, and coping among African American college students. Journal of College Student Development, 43, 605-613. [locate and print]

- * Kolko, V. B. (2003). A history of Jews in American higher education. Indiana University Student Personnel Association Journal. Retrieved January 9, 2003 from  http://www.indiana.edu/~iuspa/Journal/2003/History%20of%20Jews.pdf [ANGEL]

 

Assignment due (for some): Research paper and lit review probable sources; site map for website

 

 

* March 23                Climate Issues, continued (Ability, Social Class)

(return from NASPA)

Readings for today:

- Walpole, M. Socioeconomic status. Encyclopedia.

- +hooks, b. (2000, November 17). Learning in the shadow of race and class. Chronicle of Higher Education, B14-16.

- *LaPaglia, N. (1995). Working-class women as academics: Seeing in two directions, awkwardly.  In C.L. Barney Dews & C.L. Law (Eds.), This fine place so far from home: Voices of academics from the working class (pp. 177-186). Philadelphia: Temple University Press. [ANGEL]

- Rendón, L. From the Barrio to the academy: Revelations of a Mexican American scholarship girl. ASHE Reader.            

- *Borrego, S.E. (2003). Class matters: Beyond access to inclusion. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. [ANGEL]

-Pliner, S.M. Women with disabilities. Encyclopedia.

- +Fisher, M. (July 18, 2002). Light at the end of the tunnel. Black Issues in Higher Education, 19 (11), 24-26. Retrieve online through WilsonSelectPlus.

 

Assignment: Go the main web page of your employment or assistantship office (if you don’t have one, choose an academic department or other location on campus). Run a “Bobby” test for accessibility by visiting http://bobby.watchfire.com/bobby/html/en/index.jsp  and typing in the URL of the website you have selected. Come prepared to discuss what you learned.

 

 

CURRICULUM

 

* March 30                Approaches to – and Controversies Regarding – Diversity and

Multiculturalism in Curriculum

 

Readings for today:

- Curriculum overview - Encyclopedia

- Banks, J.A. Multicultural education: Historical development, dimensions, and practice. ASHE Reader.

- García, M., & Smith, D.G. Reflecting inclusiveness in the curriculum. ASHE Reader.

-+Coughlin, E.K. (1992). Scholars confront fundamental question: Which vision of America should prevail? Chronicle of Higher Education.

- Purcell, F. Women’s studies. Encyclopedia.

- *Jones, B.A. (2002). African American studies. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 53-55). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

- *Wang, L.L. (2002). Asian American studies. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 75-80). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

- *Delgado Bernal, D., & Gándara, P. (2002). Latina/o, Hispanic, Chicana/o studies. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 383-385). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

- * Dilley, P. (2002). Lesbian and gay studies. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 395-397). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

-*Stein, W.J. (2002). Native American studies. In J.J.F. Forest & K. Kinser (Eds.), Higher education in the United States: An encyclopedia (pp. 430-432). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. [ANGEL]

 

 

* April 6                    Curriculum: Approaches and Controversies, continued

 

Readings for today:

- Morrison, T. How can values be taught in the university? ASHE Reader.

- Gitlin, T. The rise of “identity politics”: An examination and a critique. ASHE Reader.

- Chan, S. On the ethnic studies requirement: Part 1: Pedagogical implications. ASHE Reader.

-+Martínez Alemán, A.M. (2001). Community, higher education, and the challenged of multiculturalism. Teachers College Record, 103, 485-503.

-+Willie, C.V. (1992). Multiculturalism bashing: A review of magazine coverage. Change, 24 (1), 70-73.

-+Thelin, J.R. (1992). The curriculum crusades and the conservative backlash. Change, 24 (1), 17-23.

-+Levine, A., & Cureton, J. (1992). The quiet revolution: Eleven facts about multiculturalism and the curriculum. Change, 24 (1), 25-29. (cont…)

 

Assignment: Choose a four-year undergraduate institution. Examine requirements for multicultural education in the curriculum, as well as non-required courses and curricular opportunities. Include ethnic, women’s, lesbian & gay (queer), and any other studies as available. Be prepared to discuss in class.

 

Assignment due (for some): book reviews and issue papers

 

 

April 13 – NO CLASS MEETING

 

OUTCOMES

 

* April 20                  Student Outcomes

 

Readings for today:

- Steele, C.M. A threat in the air: How stereotypes shape intellectual identity and performance. ASHE Reader.

- antonio, a.l. Diversity and the influence of friendship groups in college. ASHE Reader.

- Astin, A.W. Diversity and multiculturalism on campus: How are students affected? ASHE Reader.

-Terenzini, P.T., Cabrera, A.F., Colbeck, C.L., Bjorklund, S.A., & Parente, J.M. Racial and ethnic diversity in the classroom: Does it promote student learning? ASHE Reader.

- Rendón, L.I., Jalomo, R.E., & Nora, A. Theoretical considerations in the study of minority student retention in higher education. ASHE Reader.

-+Horn, L., Berktold, J., Bobbitt, L. (June, 1999). Students with disabilities in postsecondary education: A profile of preparation, participation, and outcomes. National Center for Education Statistics Statistical Analysis Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Research and Improvement. [locate at: http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/peqis/publications/2000092/ ]

 

Assignment due (for some): Research paper, lit review, website

Final exam questions available today for those writing exam

 

 

April 27                     Faculty and Administrator Outcomes

 

Readings for today:

- Perna, L. Tenure and promotion. Encyclopedia.

- Tierney, W.G., & Bensimon, E.M. Socialization and cultural taxation: Race and ethnicity in the academy. ASHE Reader.

- Lindsay, B. Forging new university initiatives in the twenty-first century: Women executives and equity. ASHE Reader.

 

Assignment due: Final exam due for those writing exam

Assignment due: Oral presentations of research papers or lit reviews for those doing presentations.

 

May 4 (Exam Week)  Course Wrap Up and Evaluation

Assignment due: Final self and course evaluation