Annotations


Note: There is little difference between an annotation and an abstract, other than that an abstract is often longer than an annotation. You may have noticed an abstract at the beginning of a journal article; its purpose is to summarize the article. Annotations, on the other hand, often appear within bibliographies. For the purpose of this research aid, "annotations" refers to both annotations and abstracts.
For more good examples of annotated bibliographies, please see this page.


What Is an Annotation?

Types of Annotations

Format of Annotation

London, Herbert. "Five Myths of the Television Age." Television Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 1982): 81-89.

OPENING SENTENCE:

Herbert London, a Dean at New York University and author of several books and articles, explains how television contradicts five ideas commonly believed by most people.

BODY:

He uses specific examples seen on television, such as the assassination of John Kennedy, to demonstrate his points. His examples contradict such common truisms as "seeing is believing," "a picture is worth a thousand words," and "satisfaction is its own reward." London uses logical arguments to support his ideas, and doesn't refer to any previous works on the topic: the article is his personal opinion. His style and vocabulary would make the article of interest to any scholarly reader dealing with this topic.

CLOSING SENTENCE:

The article clearly illustrates London's points, but does not explore their implications, leaving the reader with many unanswered questions.

Thus the final entry looks like this (without the box):

  • London, Herbert. "Five Myths of the Television Age." Television Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 1982): 81-89.

Herbert London, a Dean at New York University and author of several books and articles, explains how television contradicts five ideas commonly believed by most people. He uses specific examples seen on television, such as the assassination of John Kennedy, to demonstrate his points. His examples contradict such common truisms as "seeing is believing," "a picture is worth a thousand words," and "satisfaction is its own reward." London uses logical arguments to support his ideas, and doesn't refer to any previous works on the topic: the article is his personal opinion. His style and vocabulary would make the article of interest to any scholarly reader dealing with this topic. The article clearly illustrates London's points, but does not explore their implications, leaving the reader with many unanswered questions. Clearly useful in reasearch concerning mythologies of television.


The following is an example of a summary annotation for a journal article:

CITATION:

London, Herbert. "Five Myths of the Television Age." Television Quarterly 10.1 (Spring 1982): 81-89.

OPENING SENTENCE:

The author explains how television contradicts five ideas commonly believed by most people, using specific examples seen on television, such as the assassination of John Kennedy, to demonstrate his points.

BODY:

His examples contradict such common truisms as "seeing is believing," "a picture is worth a thousand words," and "satisfaction is its own reward." London uses logical arguments to support his ideas, and doesn't refer to any previous works on the topic: the article is his personal opinion.

CLOSING SENTENCE:

His style and vocabulary would make the article of interest to any reader dealing with this topic.


Characteristics of Annotations

STYLE

FORMAT OF PARAGRAPH

LANGUAGE AND VOCABULARY

FORMAT OF SENTENCES


More examples (from <http://library.ucsc.edu/ref/howto/annotated.html>) of very basic annotated bibliography entries; though not as useful as those described above as they lack a notion of context, they are still worth your viewing.

Critiques Third World rural development strategies that promote large-scale agriculture based on uniform crop varieties. Describes Agroecosystem Analysis and Development, which stresses sustainability, equity, stability, and productivity. Lists examples of sustainable traditional farming systems and agroecological approaches to rural development.

Very comprehensive reference book of 3,296 pages (more than 10,000 entries) encompassing all styles of popular music, including jazz. Primarily biographical, but does contain record label histories. Entries from 150 to 3,000 words, though some important artists have longer entries. Most artists from UK and US, though additionally many reggae, Latin, and Afro-pop artists from outside these countries. Most entries include discography.


For further information, consult these works which will lead to many others:

To find books you can check out of the library, search under these subjects:

original material submitted by: Kelly Roddy (kroddy@bgnet.bgsu.edu)
3 Aug 1995 16:09:11 -0400 (EDT)]
gopher://gopher.bgsu.edu:70/00/Library/library-research/Annotations