Linda A. Jackson

Professional Vita

Professor, Department of Psychology

Michigan State University

East Lansing, Michigan 48824

Phone: 517 353-7207 FAX: 517 432-2476

jackso67@msu.edu

http://www.msu.edu/user/jackso67/

December, 2013

 

Education:

Undergraduate: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, BS, Genetics/Microbiology, June, 1970.

Graduate: Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT), Science Education, May, 1973.

Graduate: University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, MA, Psychology. January, 1980.

Graduate: University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, PhD, Psychology, June, 1981. Major Area: Social Psychology; Minor Areas: Statistics and Experimental Design, Developmental Psychology.

 

Professional Experience:

Professor: Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824, June 1993 to present.

Adjunct Professor: Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, December 2004 to present.

Research Associate: Media Interface and Networking Design (M.I.N.D.) Laboratory, Michigan State University, September 2001 to present.

Assistant/Associate Professor: Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, September 1981 to June 1993.

 

Research Interests:

The impact of Information Technology (IT) use (e.g., Internet, cell phones) on cognitive, social, psychological and moral development. Of particular interest are the relationships between videogame playing and creativity (cognitive), friendship networks (social) and real- and virtual-world behavior (moral) and on informal STEM (Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) learning and interests.

IT-mediated learning effects on Kindergarten readiness in Head Start children.

Cultural, social and psychological factors influencing the use and consequences of using Social Networking Sites (SNSs): Comparisons between collectivistic cultures (e.g., China) and individualistic cultures (e.g., U.S.).

Cross-cultural differences in real- and virtual-world morality: Acceptability and frequency of morally questionable behavior.

Gender, race and culture: Influences on the frequency and nature of IT use and consequences for interests in and choices of careers in STEM areas.

Digital divides in the frequency and nature of IT use within and across cultures: Implications for academic performance and occupational choice.


Publications (books):

Jackson, L. A. (in preparation, to be completed during Consultant ship Year, 2015-2016). Introduction to Techno-psychology: A new sub-discipline within Psychology.

Jackson, L. A., Murray, M. (1997). What students really think of professors. Lampeter, Ceredigion, Wales, UK: Edwin Mellen Press.

Jackson, L. A. (1992). Physical appearance and gender: Sociobiological and sociocultural perspectives. New York: State University of New York.

 

Publications (book chapters):

Jackson, L. J. (in preparation). The relationship between videogame playing and creativity: Why videogame playing increases creativity and its potential for increasing other desirable cognitive as well as social outcomes. Invited chapter to appear in Videogames and Creativity, Garo Green and James C. Kaufman (Eds.), part of the Research Frontiers in Creativity book Series, Academic Press.

Jackson, L. J. Qiu, W., Games, A. & Zhao, Y. (2013). The digital divides in China. In  A. Esarey & R. Kluver (Eds.). The Internet in China: An Encyclopedic Handbook of Online Business, Information Distribution, and Social Connectivity. Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire Publishing Group. http://www.berkshirepublishing.com/home/product.aspx?projid=87.

Jackson, L. J., Games, A., Qiu, W. & Zhao, Y. (2013). Gender and the Internet. In  A. Esarey & R. Kluver (Eds.). The Internet in China: An Encyclopedic Handbook of Online Business, Information Distribution, and Social Connectivity. Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire PublishingGroup. http://www.berkshirepublishing.com/home/product.aspx?projid=87.

Qiu, W., Games, A., Jackson, L. A. & Zhao, Y. (in press;1st Edition, 2013). The Internet and Children in China. In  A. Esarey & R. Kluver (Eds.). The Internet in China: An Encyclopedic Handbook of Online Business, Information Distribution, and Social Connectivity. Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire Publishing Group. http://www.berkshirepublishing.com/home/product.aspx?projid=87.

Jackson, L. A. & Witt, E. A. (2012). Internet use and cognitive development. In Y. Zheng (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior, Chapter 27 (pp. 315-327). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Jackson, L. A. et., al.(2011). Does home Internet use influence the academic performance of low-income children? McGraw-Hill Co. Editor Request to include in Global Citizenship: Custom Textbook for Global Education Network Schools, April.

Jackson, L. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Witt, E. A. (2010). The digital divides in the U.S.: Access, broadband, and nature of Internet use. Invited chapter. In E. Ferro, Y. K. Dwivedi, J. R. Gil-Garcoa & M. D.Williams (Eds). Overcoming Digital Divides: Constructing an Equitable and Competitive Iinformation Society. (Vol 1, pp. 223-238). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Jackson, L. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Witt, E. A. (2010). The adolescent digital divide. In R.J.R. Levesque (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Adolescence. NY: Springer.

Jackson, L. A. (2008). Adolescents and the Internet. Invited chapter. In D. Romer & P. Jamieson (Eds.). The Changing Portrayal of American Youth in Popular Media (pp. 377-410). Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, NY: Oxford University Press.

Jackson, L.A., Zhao, Y., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Harold, R. (2006). The impact of Information Technology (IT) use on children’s cognitive, social, psychological and moral development. In K. Morgan, C. A. Brebbia & J. M. Spector (Eds.). WWW: The Internet Society II: Advances in Education, Commerce and Governance (pp. 23-32). Southampton, UK: WIT Press.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2006). Children's home Internet use: Predictors and psychological, social and academic consequences. In R. Kraut,  M. Brynin & S. Kiesler  (Eds.). Computers, Phones and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology (pp. 145-167). NY: Oxford University Press.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2005). Personality and use of the Internet’s information and communication tools: Findings from the HomeNetToo Project. In K-H. Renner, A. Schütz & F. Machilek (Eds.), Internet and Personality (pp. 93-105). Gottingen, Germany: Hogrefe Verlag GmbH & Co. KG.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004).  Cognitive style and interface design: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. In. K. Morgan, C. A. Brebbia & J. M. Spector (Eds).  WWW: The Internet Society: Advances in Learning, Commerce and Security (pp. 195-204).  Southampton, UK: WIT Press.

Jackson, L. A. (2004).  The digital divide.  Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 171-175). W. S. Bainbridge (Ed.), National Science Foundation, Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire Publishing.     

Jackson, L. A. (2004). Gender and computing.  Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 276-281). W. S. Bainbridge (Ed.), National Science Foundation, Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire Publishing.     

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., von Eye, A. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). HomeNetToo: Home Internet use in low-income families: Is access to the Internet enough? In E. P Bucy & J. E. Newhagen (Eds.). Media access: Social and Psychological Dimensions of New Technology Use. (pp. 155-183). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum Associates.

Jackson, L. A. (2002). Physical attractiveness: A sociocultural perspective.  In T. F. Cash and T. Pruzinsky (Eds.). Body Image: A Handbook of Theory, Research, and Clinical Practice. NY: Guilford Press.

Jackson, L. A. (2000). Using the Internet for training and development. In E. E. Kossek & R. N. Block (Eds.).  Managing human resources in the 21st Century: From core concepts to strategic choice. South-Western College Publishing.

Jackson, L. A. & Fitzgerald, H. E.(1988). 'What is beautiful is good:' The importance of physical attractiveness in infancy and early childhood. Child International, 1988, 7th edition, Ian Donald (Ed.). Eltan Limited, London.

 

Publications (refereed journals):

Wang, J-L., Jackson, L. A., Gaskin, J. & Wang, H.(Submitted, November, 2013). The effects of Social Networking Site (SNS) use on Chinese college students' friendships and well-being. Computers in Human Behavior.

Wang, J-L, Jackson, L. A., Zhang, D-J., Su, Z-Q. & Hu, T-Q. (submitted, May, 2013). Predictive effects of distinct personality traits, attitudes, motivations and Internet self-efficacy on college students’ Social Networking Site use. New Media & Society. 

Jackson, L. A. & Wang, J-L. (2013). Cultural differences in social networking site use: A comparative study of China and the United States. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 910-921. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2012.11.024

Wang, J-L., Zhang, D-J. & Jackson, L.A. (2013). The influence of self-esteem, locus of control, and organizational climate on psychological empowerment in a sample of Chinese teachers.  Journal of Applied Social Psychology. pp. 1429-1438. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jasp.12009.

Wang, J-L., Jackson, L.A., Zhang, D-J. & Su, Z-Q. (2012). The relationships among the Big Five personality factors, self-esteem, narcissism, and sensation-seeking to Chinese university students’ uses of Social Networking Sites (SNSs). Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 226-232.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, A. I., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Yong, Y. (2012). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and Technology Project. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 370-376.

Jackson, L. A. & Games, A. I. (2012). The upside of video game playing. Invited paper. Special Issue. Games for Health Journal, 1, 452-455.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A. & Massman, A. J. (2012). The changing IT landscape in youth’s Information Technology (IT) use: The impact of the Big Five Personality factors and self-esteem. Studies in Surveying and Mapping Science International. Open-access, online, peer-reviewed journal published quarterly.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Fitzgerald, H.  E., Zhao, Y. & Wang, J-L. (2012). Children’s Internet use, cell phone use and videogame playing: Predicting real life social outcomes from virtual life activities. Special Issue, Youth, Internet and Well-being. Computers and Human Behavior, 28, 342-355.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A. Witt, E. A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2011). A longitudinal study of the effects of Internet use and videogame playing on academic performance and the roles of gender, race and income in these relationships. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 153-159. 

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Witt, E. A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Internet use, videogame playing and cell phone use as predictors of children’s body mass index (BMI), body weight, academic performance and social and overall self-esteem. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 852-861.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Parent behavior, children’s technology use and creativity: Videogames count but parents don’t. Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking, 21, 235-243.

Wang, J-L., Jackson, L. A. & Zhang, D-J. (2011). The mediator role of self-disclosure and moderator roles of gender and social anxiety in the relationship between Chinese adolescents’ online communication and their real-world social relationships. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 261-268.

Witt, E. A., Massman, A. J. & Jackson, L. A. (2011). Trends in youth’s videogame playing, overall computer use, and communication technology use: The impact of self-esteem and the Big Five personality factors. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 763-769.

Jackson, L. A. & Games, A. (2010). The decade of the handheld: Optimizing outcomes for the handheld generation. Featured article. Journal of CyberTherapy & Rehabilitation, 13-14.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Zhao, Y. & Witt, E. A. (2010). Information technology (IT) use and academic performance. Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 126-134.

Ghumman, S. S. & Jackson, L. A. (2010). The downside of religious attire: The Muslim headscarf and expectations for obtaining employment. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 31, 14-23.

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y. Witt, E. A. Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Harold, R. (2009). Self-concept, self-esteem, gender, race, and information technology use.  CyberPsychology & Behavior, 12, 437-440.

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y., Witt, E. A., Fitzgerald, H. E. & von Eye, A. (2009). Gender, race and morality in the virtual world and its relationship to morality in the real world. Sex Roles, 60, 859-863. 

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y., Qiu, W., Kolenic, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Harold, R. & von Eye, A. (2008). Cultural differences in morality in the real and virtual worlds: A comparison of Chinese and U.S. youth. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 11, 279-286.

Ghumman, S. S. & Jackson, L. A. (2008). Between a cross and a hard place: Religious identifiers and employability. Journal of Workplace Rights, 13, 259-280.

Jackson, L. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Zhao, Y., Kolenic, A. & von Eye, A. (2008). Information Technology (IT) use and children's psychological well-being. CyberPsychology & Behavior, 11, 755-757.    

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y., Qiu, W., Kolenic, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Harold, R. & von Eye, A. (2008). Culture, gender and information technology use: A comparison of Chinese and U.S. youth. Computers in Human Behavior, 24, 2817-2829.

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y., Kolenic, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Harold, R. & von Eye, A. (2008). Race, gender and information technology use: The new digital divide. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 11, 437-442.

Jackson, L. A., Samona, R., Moomaw, J., Ramsay, L., Murray, C., Smith, A. & Murray, L. (2007). What children do on the Internet: Domains visited and their relationship to socio-demographic characteristics and academic performance. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 10, 182-190.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2006). Does home Internet use influence the academic performance of low-income children? Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Special Section on Children, Adolescents, and the Internet. Developmental Psychology, 42, 429-435.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y.  & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2006). Social support and Internet use: The relationship between family support for Internet use and actual Internet use by low-income adults.  IT and Society, 6, 3-10.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2005). How low-income children use the Internet at home. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 16, 259-272.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G., & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2005). Instructional set and Internet use. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 8, 465-472.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F., Fitzgerald, H. E., & Zhao, Y. (2004). The social impact of Internet use on the other side of the digital divide. Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery, 47, 43-47.

Barbatsis, G., Camacho, M. &  Jackson, L. A. (2004). Does it speak to me? Visual aesthetics and the digital divide. Journal of Visual Studies, 19, 36-51. 

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Barbatsis, G., Fitzgerald, H. E. & Zhao, Y. (2003). Internet attitudes and Internet use: Some surprising findings from the HomeNetToo project.  International Journal of Human Computer Studies, 59, 355-382.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Fitzgerald, H. E. & Zhao, Y. (2003). Personality, cognitive style, demographic characteristics and Internet use - Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Special Issue, Studying the Internet: A challenge for modern psychology. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 62, 79-90.

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Implications of the digital divide in Internet use in low-income families.  IT & Society, 1, 219-244. 

Stephan, W. G., Ybarra, O., Bettencourt, A., Boniecki, K. A., Ervin, K. S., Jackson, L. A., McNatt, P. & Renfro, C. L. (2002). The racial attitudes of blacks and whites: An integrated threat theory analysis. Personality and  Social Psychology Bulletin, 28, 1242-1254. Winner: Gordon Allport Award, Best Paper on Inter-group Relations, 2001, awarded by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.

Jackson, L. A., Ervin, K. S., Gardner, P. D. & Schmitt, N.  (2001). The racial digital divide: Motivational, affective, and cognitive correlates of Internet use. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 31, 2019-2046.

Jackson, L. A., Ervin, K. S., Gardner, P. D. & Schmitt, N.  (2001). Gender and the Internet: Women communicating and men searching. Sex Roles, 44, 363-380.    

Lewandowski, D. A. & Jackson, L. A.  (2001). Perceptions of inter-racial couples: Prejudice at the dyadic level. Journal of Black Psychology, 288-303.

Jackson, L. A., Lewandowski, D. A., Fleury, R. E. & Chin, P. P.  (2001). Effects of affect, stereotype consistency and valence of behavior on causal attributions. Journal of Social Psychology, 14, 1-18.

Rosenfeld, L. B., Stewart, S. C., Stinnet, H. J. & Jackson, L. A. (1999). Preferences for body type and body characteristics associated with attractive and unattractive bodies: Jackson and McGill Revisited. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 89, 459-470.

Jackson, L. A., Lewandowski, D. A., Ingram, J. M. & Hodge, C. N. (1997). Group stereotypes: Content, gender specificity, and affect associated with typical group members. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 12, 381-396.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A., Harnish, R. & Hodge, C. N. (1996). Achieving positive social identity: Social mobility, social creativity, and permeability of group boundaries. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70, 241-254.

Jackson, L. A., Hodge, C. N., Gerard, D. A., Ingram, J. M., Ervin, K. S., & Sheppard, L. A. (1996). Cognition, affect, and behavior in the prediction of group attitudes. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 22, 306-316.

Jackson, L. A., Fleury, R. E. & Gerard, D. A. (1996). Feminism: Definitions, support and correlates of support among female and male college students. Sex Roles, 34, 687-693.

Jackson, L. A. & McGill, O. D. (1996). Body type preferences and body characteristics associated with attractive and unattractive bodies by African Americans and Anglo Americans. Sex Roles, 35, 295-308.

Jackson, L. A. & Gerard, D. A. (1996). Diurnal types, the "Big Five" personality factors, and other personal characteristics. Journal of Social Behavior and Personality, 11, 273-283.

Jackson, L. A., Hunter, J. E. & Hodge, C. N. (1995). Physical attractiveness and intellectual competence: A meta-analytic review. Social Psychology Quarterly, 58, 108-122.

Jackson, L. A., Fleury, R. E., Girvin, J. L. & Gerard, D. A. (1995). The numbers game: Gender and attention to numerical information. Sex Roles, 33, 509-518.

Jackson, L. A., Hodge, C. N. & Ingram, J. M. (1994). Gender and self-concept: A reexamination of differences and the role of gender attitudes. Sex Roles, 30, 615-630.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A. & Hodge, C. N. (1993). Stereotype effects on attributions, predictions, and evaluations: No two social judgments are quite alike. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 69-84.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1993). Parental role participation and perceptions of responsibility for children's school adjustment. Sex Roles, 28, 485-491.

Jackson, L. A., Hansen, C. H., Hansen, R. D. & Sullivan, L. A. (1993). The effects of stereotype consistency and consensus information on predictions of performance. Journal of Social Psychology, 133, 293-306.

Jackson, L. A., Gardner, P. D. & Sullivan, L.A. (1993). Engineering persistence: Past, present, and future factors and gender differences. Higher Education, 26, 227-246.

Hodge, C. N., Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1993). The "freshman 15:" Facts and fantasies about weight gain in college females. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 17, 119-126.

Jackson, L. A. (1992). In what way is the unfinished mind unfinished? Psychological Inquiry, 3, 163-165.

Jackson, L. A., Gardner, P. D. & Sullivan, L. A. (1992). Explaining gender differences in self-pay expectations: Social comparison standards and perceptions of fair pay. Journal of Applied Psychology, 77, 651-663.

Jackson, L. A. & Ervin, K. S. (1992). Narcissism and body image. Journal of Research in Personality, 26, 357-370.

Jackson, L. A. & Ervin, K. S. (1992). Height stereotypes of women and men: The liabilities of shortness for both sexes. Journal of Social Psychology, 132, 433-445.

Jackson, L. A. & Ervin, K. S. (1991). The frequency and portrayal of black females in fashion advertisements. Journal of Black Psychology, 18, 67-70.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1990). Perceptions of multiple role participants. Social Psychology Quarterly, 53, 274-282.

Jackson, L. A. (1989). Relative deprivation and the gender wage gap. In M. Wittig, & R. Lowe (Eds.). Approaching pay equity through comparable worth. Journal of Social Issues, 45, 117-133.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1989). Cognition and affect in evaluations of stereotyped group members. Journal of Social Psychology, 129, 659-672.

Jackson, L. A. & Jeffers, D. L. (1989). The Attitudes about Reality Scale: A new measure of personal epistemology. Journal of Personality Assessment, 53, 353-365.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1988). Age stereotype disconfirming information and evaluations of old people. Journal of Social Psychology, 128, 721-729.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A. & Rostker, R. (1988). Gender, gender role, and body image. Sex Roles, 19, 429-443.

Jackson, L. A. & Grabski, S. V. (1988). Perceptions of fair pay and the gender wage gap. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 18, 606-625.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1987). The ingroup favorability bias in the minimal groups situation. Journal of Social Psychology, 127, 461-472.

Jackson, L. A. (1987). Gender and distributive justice behavior: The influence of gender-related characteristics on allocation. Sex Roles, 17, 73-91.

Jackson, L. A., Hymes, R. W. & Sullivan, L. A. (1987). The effects of positive information on evaluations of Black and White targets by Black and White subjects. Journal of Social Psychology, 127, 309-316.

Jackson, L. A., MacCoun, R. J. & Kerr, N. L. (1987). Stereotypes and nonstereotypic judgments: The effects of gender role attitudes on ratings of likability, adjustment, and occupational potential. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 13, 45-52.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A. & Hymes, J. (1987). Gender, gender role, and physical appearance. Journal of Psychology, 121, 51-56.

Jackson, L. A. (1986). Self-conceptions and gender role: The correspondence between gender role categorization and open-ended self descriptions. Sex Roles, 14, 211-231.

Jackson, L. A., Ialongo, N. S. & Stollak, G. E. (1986). Parental correlates of gender role: The relations between parents' masculinity, femininity, and childrearing behaviors and their children’s gender role. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 4, 204-224.

Card, A. L., Jackson, L. A., Ialongo, N. S. & Stollak, G. E. (1986). Gender role and person perception accuracy. Sex Roles, 15, 159-171.

Jackson, L. A., Messe, L. A. & Hunter, J. E. (1985). Gender and gender role in distributive justice behavior. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 6, 329-343.

Jackson, L. A. & Cash, T. F. (1985). Components of gender stereotypes and their implications for stereotypic and nonstereotypic inferences. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 11, 326-344.

Jackson, L. A. & Hymes, R. W. (1985). Gender and social categorization: Familiarity and ingroup polarization in recall and evaluation. Journal of Social Psychology, 125, 81-88.

Blanck, P.D., Reis, H. T. & Jackson, L. A. (1984). The effects of verbal reinforcement on intrinsic motivation for sex-linked tasks. Sex Roles, 10, 364-386.

Jackson, L. A. (1983). Gender, physical attractiveness, and sex role in occupational treatment discrimination: The influence of trait and role assumptions. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 13, 443-458.

Jackson, L. A. (1983). The perception of androgyny and physical attractiveness: Two is better than one. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 9, 405-413.

Jackson, L. A. (1983). The influence of sex, physical attractiveness, sex-role, and occupational sex-linkage on perceptions of occupational suitability. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 13, 31-44.

Reis, H. T. & Jackson, L. A. (1981). Sex differences in reward allocation: Subjects, partners, and tasks. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 40, 465-478.

Jackson, L. A. & Larrance, D. T. (1979). Is a 'refinement' if attribution theory necessary to accommodate the learned helplessness reformulation? A critique of the reformulation of Abramson, Seligman, & Teasdale. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 88, 681-682.

Jackson, L. A., Rivera, A. N. & Tedeschi, J. T. (1979). The transgression-compliance relationship: Guilt, negative affect or impression management? Journal of Social Psychology, 108, 57-62.

 

Publications (abstracts/proceedings):

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A. & Games, I. A. (2011). Videogame playing and creativity: Findings from the Children and Technology Project. Proceedings of the National Social Science Association Conference, Seattle, Washington, USA/Victoria, Canada, July 31 - August 3.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E, A., Fitzgerald, H. E, von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Parent behavior, children’s technology use and creativity: Videogames count but parents don’t! Proceedings of the World Scientific Engineering Academy and Society (WSEAS) & Circuits/Systems, Computers and Communications NAUN International conference and ISI/SCI Web of Science and Web of Knowledge. Corfu Island, Greece, July 14-17.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Perceptions of parent behavior and children’s information technology use. Proceedings of the ED-MEDIA 2011-World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications, Lisbon, Portugal, June 27 – July 1. http://www.aace.org/conf/edmedia/.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E, A., von Eye, A., Zhao,Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2010). Children’s Information Technology (IT) use and their physical, cognitive, social and psychological well-being. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Digital Society, ICDS 2010, St. Maarten, Netherlands Antilles, February 10-16.

Jackson, L. A., von eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Witt, E. A. & Zhao, Y. (2009). Information Technology (IT) use and children’s academic performance. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Internet and Web Applications and Services ICIW 2009, Venice, Italy, May 24-28.

Jackson, L.A., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Witt, E. A., & Zhao, Y. (2009). Videogame playing, cell phone use and academic performance: Some good news. Proceedings of the International Association for the Development of Information Systems: (IADIS) International Conference e-Society. Barcelona, Spain, February 25-28. Outstanding Paper Award.

Ahmedani, B. K., Shifflet-Gibson, E. D., Fitton, V. A., Harold, R. D. & Jackson, L. A. (2009). The impact of Information Technology (IT) on psychosocial development among youth. Proceedings of the Society for Social Work Research Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA., January 20-23.

Jackson, L.A., Zhao, Y., Qiu, W. & Kolenic, A. (2008). Morality in Cyberspace: A comparison of Chinese and US youth’s beliefs about acceptable online behavior. Proceedings of the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Waikoloa, Big Island, Hawaii, January 7-10.

Shifflet-Gibson, E. D., Harold, R. D., Fitton, V. A., Ahmedani, B. K. & Jackson, L. A. (2008). Adolescents' growing social environment: Bridging space and enhancing relationships with technology. Proceedings of the Council on Social Work Education Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA. October 12-15.

Ahmedani, B. K., Shifflet-Gibson, E. D., Fitton, V. A., Harold, R. D. & Jackson, L. A. (2008). Information technology and the future of social work education: Knowledge from kids. Proceedings of the Council on Social Work Education Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA. October 23-25.

Jackson, L. A., Dang, C., Biocca, F., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. (2005). Interface design and intentions to use health information in low-income adults. Proceedings of the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) International 2005 Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, July 22-27. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Low-income children’s career aspirations and Internet use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Proceedings of the International IPSI 2004 Conference, Symposium on Challenges in Internet and Interdisciplinary Research. Venice, Italy, November 10-15.  

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F., von Eye, A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Children's Internet use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Proceedings of ED-MEDIA, World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications. Lugano, Switzerland, June 21-26.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Effects of alternative interface designs for presenting health information to African Americans. Proceedings of the International Conference on New Learning Paradigms and New Learning Tools. New Learning 2004), Skiathos, Greece, May 10-12.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Does Internet use influence the academic performance of low-income children? Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Proceedings of the First Latin American World Wide Web Conference: Empowering the Web. Santiago, Chile, November 10-12.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F., Lim, L., Bradburn, K., Tang, M., Mou, W., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. (2003). Presence, learning and attitudes in virtual environments: A comparison between 3-D spatial, interpersonal and standard interfaces in transmitting health information to low-income users. Proceedings of the International Conference on Computers in Education 2003 (ICCE 2003), Hong Kong, China, December 2-5.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F., Lim, L., Bradburn, K., Tang, M., Mou, W., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y.& Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Effects of culturally adapted interfaces on learning and attitudes: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Proceedings of the International Association for the Development of Information Society (IADIS) International Conference, WWW/Internet 2003, Algarve, Portugal, November 5-8.

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). Trust and the Internet: Findings from the HomeNetToo Project. Proceedings of the AACE- Association for the Advancement of Computing  in Education: E-Learn 2002: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare and Higher Education. Montreal, Canada, October 15-19.

Jackson, L.A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., von Eye, A. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). Home Internet use in low-income families: Perceptions of injustice in cyberspace. Proceedings of the 2002 Academy of Management Meeting. Denver, CO, Aug 9-14.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). The HomeNetToo project: Predicting Internet use from trust-related attitudes about the Internet. Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Motivation. Moscow, Russia, June 12-15.

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F., Zhao, Y., von Eye, A. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). Home Internet use in low-income families: Frequency, nature and correlates of early use in the HomeNetToo project. Proceedings of  the  11th International World Wide Web Conference (WWW11). Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S. May 7-11.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Zhao, Y. & Ware, D. (2001). HomeNetToo: Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and Internet use: A model to explain the racial digital divide and the Internet paradox. Proceedings of the 10th International World Wide Web Conference (WWW10). Hong  Kong, China, May 1-5.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Zhao, Y. & Ware, D. (2000). HomeNetToo: A model to explain the racial digital divide and the Internet paradox. Proceedings of WebNet 2000-World Conference on the WWW and Internet, Association for the Advancement of Computers in Education (AACE). San Antonio, TX, October 30-November 4.

Jackson, L. A. (1998). Race/ethnicity and the World Wide Web: The Vision-The Reality-The Vision. Proceedings of WebNet98-World Conference of the WWW, Internet, and Intranet, Association for the Advancement of Computers in Education (AACE), Orlando, FL, November 7-12.

Jackson, L. A., Gerard, D. A., Ingram, J. M. & Hodge, C. N. (1996). Eliciting affect associated with African Americans, Asian-Americans, male homosexuals, and the physically attractive. International Journal of Psychology, 31, p. 326. In F. Y. Dore (Ed.). Abstracts of the XXVI International Congress of Psychology, Montreal, Canada, August 16-21.

Jackson, L. A., Ialongo, N. & Stollak, G. E. (1983). Another look at parental antecedents of sex role development. ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) Database and Index (Resources in Education - RIE).

Jackson, L. A. (1986). Self conceptions and gender role: The correspondence between gender role categorization and open-ended self-descriptions. ERIC Database and Index (RIE) and Sociological Abstracts.

Jackson, L. A., Hansen, R. D., Hansen, C. H. & Sullivan, L. A. (1988). Gender stereotypes and attributions: A Bayesian analysis. ERIC Database and Index (RIE).

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A., & Rostker, R. (1988). Gender, gender role, and body image. ERIC Database and Index (RIE).

Ervin, K. S. & Jackson, L. S. (1990). The frequency and portrayal of black females in fashion advertisements. ERIC Database and Index (RIE).

 

 

 

Publications (book reviews):

Jackson, L. A. (2013). Technology Play and Brain Development: Implications for the Future of Human Behaviors. Doris Bergen, Darrel Davis and Jason Abbott, Psychology Press.

Jackson, L. A. (2007). Wired Adolescence: Teenagers’ Social Relationship in the Information Age. Gustavo Mesch and Ilan Talmud (Eds), Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. CyberPsychology and Behavior, 10, 34-36.

Jackson, L. A. (1998). Not just another book about the Internet! Review of Culture of the Internet Sara Kiesler (Ed.), 1997, Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, 1997. Contemporary Psychology, 43, 471-472.

Jackson, L. A. (1997). Sexual identity on the job: Issues and services. A. L. Ellis & E. D. B. Riggle (Eds.), 1996, Binghamton, NY: Harrington Park Press. Sex Roles, 36, 667-670.

Jackson, L. A. (1988). Beauty Bound, Rita Freedman, 1986, Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath and Co. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 12, 21-23.

 

Publications (miscellaneous):

Jackson, L. A. (2013). The State of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) performance, interests and careers in the U.S. today: What should we do? Requested report submitted to the Information and Technology and Empowerment Center (ITEC) – Lansing, June 29, 2013, Kirk Riley, Executive Director. Current Status (November 2013, to be submitted as a “white paper” in 2014)

Jackson, L.A., Witt, E. A., Games, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2013). Information technology use and creativity: Findings from the Children and Technology Project. Psychological Progress: http:psychologyprogress.com/information-technology-use-and-creativity-findings-from-the-children-and-technology-project/.

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 Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Games, Ivan (Alex), Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. Zhao, Y. (2013). Information Technology Use and Creativity: Findings from the Children and Technology Project. Jackson, L. A., (2011). The Children and Technology Project. Glogal Citizenship: Custom Textbook for Globe Education Network schools. McGraw-Hill, April 2011. 

Jackson, L. A. (2007). Children, parents and information technology use. Family Research Institute, Mini-white Papers, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

Jackson, L. A. (2005). The Influence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on East Asian Children’s Attitudes about Democracy. East-West Center Publications, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, Spring 2005.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003, December).  Children and Internet Use: Social, psychological and academic consequences for low-income families. Psychological Science Agenda, Science Directorate of the American Psychological Association, Science Briefs. 

Jackson, L. A. (2000). Monitor on Psychology, APA, April 31. A web of research, pp. 42-44.

Jackson, L. A., (2000). Monitor on Psychology, APA, April 31. Linking up online, p. 2023.

Jackson, L. A. (1997). Person Perception Questionnaire - 96. (HaPI Record). Pittsburg, PA: Behavioral Measurement Database Services. McLean, VA: BRS Search Service.

Jackson, L. A. (1995). Social Judgment Measures. (HaPI Record). Pittsburg, PA: Behavioral Measurement Database Services. McLean, VA: BRS Search Service.

Jackson, L. A., Gardner, P. D. & Sullivan, L. A. (1995). Career Expectations Survey. (HaPI Record). Pittsburg, PA: Behavioral Measurement Database Services. McLean, VA: BRS Search Service.

Jackson, L. A. (1995). Stereotypes, emotions, behavior, and overall attitudes toward Hispanics by Anglos. Julian Samora Research Institute Working Papers Series, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

Jackson, L. A. & Ervin, K. S. (1993). Person Perception Questionnaire-Trait Ratings (PPQ-TR). (HaPI Record). Pittsburg, PA: Behavioral Measurement Database Services (Producer). McLean, VA: BRS Search Service.

Jackson, L. A. & Ervin, K. S. (1993). Person Perception Questionnaire-Percentage Estimates (PPQ-%). (HaPI Record). Pittsburg, PA: Behavioral Measurement Database Services (Producer). McLean, VA: BRS Search Service.

Jackson, L. A. (1986). The "I AM" Inventory. Health Instruments File, University of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh, PA.

 

Technical Reports:

Jackson, L. A. (2013). Final Report. Research funded by the Schultz Grant. Office of the Provost, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, December.

Jackson, L. A. (2013). Final Report. Research funded by the Gwen Andrew (Faculty Initiative Fund). College of Social Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, December.

Jackson, L. A. & Foster-Fishman, P. (2005). The One-Economy Battle Creek Digital Initiative: Final Report. Battle Creek, MI, November 27.

Jackson, L. A. (2002). Final Report. Imagining the Future Project Evaluation. Advanced Network & Services (ANS), Inc., Amela Sadagic, Principal Inversitgator.

Jackson. L. A. (1997). Report on the follow-up administration of the School Self-esteem Survey. Fowlerville High School, Fowlerville, MI, May.

Jackson, L. A. (1996). Report on the results of the Faculty Classroom Teaching Survey. Office of the Provost, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. December.

Jackson, L. A. (1996). Final Report on the results of the School Self-esteem Survey. Fowlerville High School, Fowlerville, MI, October.

Jackson, L. A. (1995). Report on the results of discussions with Faculty and Administrators about an Ethnic Studies Specialization at MSU. Office of the Provost, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. October.

Jackson, L. A. (1995). Report on Ethnic Studies Programs in a sample of U.S. universities. Office of the Provost, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. October.

Jackson, L. A. (1995). Report on the preliminary results of the School Self-esteem Survey. Fowlerville High School, Fowlerville, MI, May.

Jackson, L. A. (1994). Report titled “An ethnic studies specialization at Michigan State University: Criteria for course inclusion.” Office of the Provost, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, September.

 

Presentations at Professional Conferences (referred):

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A. & Games, I. A. (2011). Videogame playing and creativity: Findings from the Children and Technology Project. National Social Science Association Conference, Seattle/Victoria, July 31-August 3.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E, A., Fitzgerald, H. E , von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Parent behavior, children’s technology use and creativity: Videogames count but parents don’t! World Scientific Engineering Academy and Society (WSEAS) & Circuits/Systems, Computers and Communications. NAUN International conference and ISI/SCI Web of Science and Web of Knowledge. Corfu Island, Greece, July 1-5.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Perceptions of parent behavior and children’s information technology use. ED-MEDIA 2011-World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications. Lisbon, Portugal, June 27-July 1.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E, A., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2010). Children’s Information Technology (IT) use and their physical, cognitive, social and psychological well-being. Paper presented at the Fourth International Conference on Digital Society, ICDS.  St. Maarten, Netherland Antilles, February 10-16.

Jackson, L. A., von eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Witt, E.A. & Zhao, Y.  (2009). Information Technology (IT) use and children’s academic performance. Fourth International Conference on Internet and Web Applications and Services ICIW. Venice, Italy, May 24-28. 

Jackson, L. A., Von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Witt, E. A. & Zhao, Y. (2009). Videogame playing, cell phone use and academic performance: Some good news. IADIS (International Association for Development of an Information Society). International Conference, E-Society (2009). Barcelona, Spain, February 26-28. Outstanding Paper Award.

Ahmedani, B. K., Shifflet Gibson, E. D., Fitton, V. A., Harold, R. D. & Jackson, L. A. (2009). The impact of Information Technology (IT) on psychosocial development among youth. Paper  presented at the Annual Meeting of  the Society for Social Work Research.New Orleans, LA., January 20-23, 2009.

Shifflet-Gibson, E., Harold, R. D., Ahmedani, B., Fitton, V. & Jackson, L. A. (2008). Adolescents’ growing social environment: Bridging space and enhancing relationships with technology. Paper presented at the Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education. Philadelphia, PA.

Ahmedani, B., Shifflet Gibson, E., Fitton, V., Harold, R. D. & Jackson, L. A. (2008). Information technology and the future of social work education: Knowledge from kids. Paper presented at the Annual Program Meeting of the Council on Social Work Education. Philadelphia, PA.

Jackson, L.A., Zhao, Y., Qiu, W., & Kolenic, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Harold, R., & von Eye, A. (2008). Morality in Cyberspace: A comparison of Chinese and US youth’s beliefs about acceptable online behavior. Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Waikoloa, Big Island, Hawaii, January 7-10.

Jackson, L.A, (2007).  Race, gender and Information Technology use: The new digital divide (HSD#0527064). National Science Foundation, Human and Social Dynamics 2007 Principal Investigators Meeting, Westin Arlington Gateway, Arlington, VA, October 1-2.

Jackson, L. A.  (2007).  Adolescents and the Internet.  Invited presentation at the workshop titled  “T:he Changing Portrayal of American Youth in Popular Media,” Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Rancho Mirage, CA, March 2-3.

Ghumman, S. & Jackson, L. A.  (2007).  Wearing your religion in the public domain: Evaluating job applicants as a function of their religion and job type. Paper presented at the symposium titled Global Examinations of Discrimination in the Contemporary Workplace. Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) Conference, Marriott Marquis, New York, April 27-29.

Biocca, F. A. & Jackson, L. A. (2007). Tailoring interfaces to individual and social differences: Experience of HomeNetToo. Invited presentation at the National Communication Association Conference, Chicago, IL, November 15-18.

Jackson, L. A. (2007) The role of cognitive biases in social science learning. NSF Science of Learning Center Catalyst Grant Workshop, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, Pensacola, FL, February 5-6.

Jackson, L.A, Zhao, Y., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Harold, R. & Kolenic, A. (2006). Children and Technology Project, National Science Foundation, Human and Social Dynamics 2006 Principal Investigators Meeting. Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Washington, DC, September 13-15.

Jackson, L. A., Zhao, Y., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Harold, R. (2006). The impact of information technology (IT) use on children’s cognitive, social, psychological and moral development. Paper presented at the Second International Conference on Advances in Education, Commerce & Governance, Internet and Society 2006, Wessex Institute of Technology, UK, and Bergen University, Norway, The New Forest, UK, June 12-14.

Jackson, L. A., Dang, C., Biocca, F. A., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2005). Interface design and intentions to use health information in low-income adults. Presentation at the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) International 2005 Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada, July 22-27.

Jackson, L.A. (2005). Does the use of information and communication technology (ICT) have a “democratizing effect” on children in East Asia and the United States? East–West Center Research Program Seminar, East–West Center, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 20, 2005.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E.  (2004). Low-income children’s career aspirations and Internet use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. International IPSI 2004 Conference, Symposium on Challenges in Internet and Interdisciplinary Research, Venice, Italy, November 10-15.   

Jackson, L. A. von Eye, A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Social antecedents and consequences of children’s Internet use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Paper presented in an invited symposium titled “Psychology of the Internet: Most recent advances in USA and China. Zheng Yan and Xiaolan Fu, Chairpersons, 28th International Congress of Psychology (ICP2004), Beijing, China, August 8-13.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Low-income children's career aspirations and their Internet Use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Annual Convention of the American Psychology Association, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, July 28 to August 1.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., von Eye, A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y., & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Children's Internet use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. ED-MEDIA, World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications, Lugano, Switzerland, June 21-26.

Jackson, L.A.  (2004). HomeNetToo: Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and Internet use: Explaining the digital divide and the Internet paradox. Invited presentation at the National Science Foundation Information Technology Research meeting for Principal Investigators. Hyatt Regency, Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia, June 9-11.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y., Barbatsis, G. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2004). Effects of alternative interface designs for presenting health information to African Americans. Paper presented at the International Conference on New Learning Paradigms and New Learning Tools (New Learning 2004), Skiathos, Greece, May 10-12. 

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., Lim, L., Bradburn, K., Tang, M., Mou, W., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Presence, learning and attitudes in virtual environments: A comparison between 3-D spatial, interpersonal and standard interfaces in transmitting health information to low-income users. International Conference on Computers in Education (ICCE 2003). Hong Kong, December 2-5.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Does Internet use influence the academic performance of low-income children? Findings from the HomeNetToo project. First Latin American World Wide Web Conference: Empowering the Web.  Santiago, Chile, November 10-12.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A, Lim, L., Bradburn, K., Tang, M., Mou, W., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Effects of culturally adapted interfaces on learning and attitudes: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. International Association for the Development of Information Society (IADIS) International Conference, WWW/Internet 2003, Algarve, Portugal, November 5-8.

Biocca, F. A., Jackson, L. A., Lim, L., Mou, W., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). When low spatial ability does not get you “there” in 3D environments, but agents jump out “here” to change attitudes. Paper presented at the Presence 20003 Conference, Aalborg University, Denmark, October, 6-8.

Lim, L., Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Bradburn, K., Tang, M., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2003). Presence in informative virtual environments: The effects of self-efficacy, spatial ability and mood. Mass Communication and Society, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Convention, Kansas City,  MO,  July  30-August 2.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Fitzgerald, H. E. & Zhao, Y.  (2003). The social impact of Internet use: Findings from the other side of the digital divide. The Twelfth International World Wide Web Conference, Budapest, Hungary, May 20-24.

Barbatsis, G., Camacho, M. & Jackson, L. A.  (2003). Visual aesthetics and the digital divide. Paper presented at VisCom 17 (Visual Communication Conference), Sandy Point, Idaho, June. 18-22.

Barbatsis, G., Camacho, M. & Jackson, L. A. (2003). HomeNetToo:Visual design and the digital divide. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association, Miami Beach, FL, November 19-23.

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F. A., von Eye, A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). Trust and the Internet: Findings from the HomeNetToo Project. Paper presented at the AACE- Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education. E-Learn 2002: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare and Higher Education, Montreal, Canada, October 15-19.

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y., von Eye, A. & Fitzgerald, H. E.  (2002). Home Internet use in low-income families: Perceptions of injustice in cyberspace. Symposium titled: "Fairness in Cyberspace:The Challenge of Maintaining Justice in a Networked Economy."  2002 Academy of Management Meeting, Denver, CO, Aug 9-14.

Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). The HomeNetToo project: Predicting Internet use from trust-related attitudes about the Internet. Symposium titled "Motivation in Cyberspace," 8th International Conference on Motivation, Moscow, Russia, June 12-15.

Jackson, L. A., Barbatsis, G., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y., von Eye, A. & Fitzgerald, H. E.  (2002). Home Internet use in low-income families: Frequency, nature and correlates of early use in the HomeNetToo project. Paper presented at the 11th International World Wide Web Conference (WWW11), Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.A., May 7-11.

Biocca, F. A., Jackson, L. A., Dobbins, H., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E. & Zhao, Y. (2001). Adapting computer interfaces to differences in cognitive and cultural style. Symposium on the Digital Divide, International Communication Association (ICA) and the International Association of Media and Communication Research (IAMCR), University of Texas, Austin, Texas, November 16-18.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Zhao, Y. & Ware, D. (2001). HomeNetToo: Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and Internet use: A model to explain the racial digital divide and the Internet paradox. 10th International World Wide Web Conference (WWW10). Hong Kong, May 1-5.

Jackson, L. A., Biocca, F. A., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Zhao, Y. & Ware, D. (2000). HomeNetToo: Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and Internet use: A model to explain the racial digital divide and the Internet paradox. WebNet 2000-World Conference on the WWW and Internet, Association for the Advancement of Computers in Education (AACE), San Antonio, TX, October 30-November 4.

Jackson, L. A. (2000). The digital divide and digital democracy. National Academies, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, Washington, DC, June 1-2.

Jackson, L. A. (1999). Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and computer/Internet use. Paper presented at the 29th Annual Convention of the Society for Computers in Psychology, Los Angeles, CA, November 18.

Jackson, L. A. (1999). Social Psychology and the Digital Divide. Paper presented at the symposium titled "The Internet: A place for social psychology." The 1999 Conference of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, St Louis, MO, October 14-16.

Jackson, L. A. (1999). Who's on the Internet: Making Sense of Internet Demographic Surveys. Paper presented at the symposium titled "Conducting Research on the Internet." American Psychological Association Convention, Boston, MA, August 1999.

Jackson, L. A. (1998). Race/Ethnicity and the World Wide Web: The vision-the reality-the vision. Paper presented at WebNet98-World Conference of the WWW, Internet and Intranet, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Orlando, FL, November 7-12.

Jackson, L. A. (1998). Race/Ethnicity and the Internet: Technology revolution or cultural divide? Paper presented at the 2nd International Harvard Conference on Internet and Society, Harvard University, May 26-29.

Jackson, L. A., Lewandowski, D. A., Fleury, R. E. & Chin, P. P. (1998). Effects of discrete positive and negative affects on causal and trait attributions. Paper presented at the 1998 Convention of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, April 30-May 2.

Chin, P. P. & Jackson, L. A. (1998). Perceptions of interracial couples with and without children. Paper presented at the 1998 Convention of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL, April 30-May 2.

Jackson, L. A. (1998). Moderator, Innovations in Chicano Psychology: Looking Toward the 21st Century. International Conference sponsored by the Julian Samora Research Institute and the Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, April 17-18.

Jackson, L. A., Lewandowski, D. A., Fleury, R. E. & Chin, P. (1997). Affect and attributions: Beyond simple pessimism and optimism in causal and trait attributions. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, October 24-26.

Jackson, L. A. (1997). Affect and attributions: Beyond simple pessimism and optimism in causal and trait attributions. Invited address. Department of Psychology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, June 28.

Jackson, L. A., (1997). Moderator. Paper session titled  “Affect and Cognition.” Midwestern Psychological Association Convention, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A., Gerard, D. A. & Ingram, J. M. & Hodge, C. N. (1996). Eliciting affect associated with African Americans, Asian Americans, male homosexuals, and the physically attractive. Paper presented at the symposium titled "Emerging concepts in attitude theory and research," Twenty-sixth International Congress of Psychology, Montreal, Canada.

Jackson, L. A., Gerard, D. A., Ingram, J. M. & Hodge, C. N. (1995). Integral affect: Affect spontaneously associated with negatively stereotyped and positively stereotyped outgroups: Paper presented at the 1995 Joint Meeting of the European Association of Experimental Social Psychology and the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Washington, D.C.

Fleury, R. E., Jackson, L. A., Girvin, J. L. & Gerard, D. A. (1995). The numbers game: Gender and attention to numerical information. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Midwestern Psychological Association.

Ingram, J. M., Hodge, C. N. & Jackson, L. A. (1995). Adult attachment and its relationship to social skills and self-consciousness. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Midwestern Psychological Association.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A., Harnish, R. & Hodge, C. N. (1994). Maintaining positive social identity. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Hodge, C. N. & Jackson, L. A. (1994). The relationship between physical attractiveness and attachment style. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A. (1993). Maintaining positive social identity: Psychological mobility, social creativity, and permeability of group boundaries. Paper presented at the Nags Head Conference on Self and Social Identity, Nags Head Conference Center, Highland Beach, FL.

Jackson, L. A. (1993). Social identity theory: Testing new hypotheses. Paper presented at the 1993 meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Santa Barbara, CA.

Jackson, L. A. (1992). Physical attractiveness and intellectual competence: A meta-analytic review of the research. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, San Antonio, TX.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1991). Stereotype inconsistency and attributions, predictions and evaluations. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A., Gardner, P. D. & Sullivan, L. A. (1991). Explaining the gender wage gap: Perceptions of fair pay. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Jackson, L. A. & Ervin, K. S. (1991). Height stereotypes: Content as a function of method of assessment. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Jackson, L. A. & Gardner, P. D. (1990). Explaining the gender wage gap: Pay expectations for self, others, and perceptions of "fair pay." Paper presented at the 6th annual conference on Women and Work, Arlington, TX.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1990). Stereotype inconsistency and attributions, predictions, and evaluations: A case of aversive racism. Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Conference on Stereotypes and Intergroup Relations, Nags Head Conference Center, Nags Head, NC.

Jackson, L. A. (1990). Expectancy disconfirmation and attributions, predictions, and evaluations. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, Buffalo, NY.

Jackson, L. A. (1989). Integrating categorical and individuating information: Predictions of task performance. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, Santa Monica, CA.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1989). Perceptions of multiple role participants. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.

Ervin, K. S. & Jackson, L. A. (1989). The frequency and portrayal of Black females in fashion advertisements. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA.

Jackson, L. A. (1989). Physical appearance and gender. Paper presented at the Sixth Invitational Conference on Sex and Gender, Nags Head Conference Center, Nags Head, NC.

Gardner, P. D. & Jackson, L. A. (1989). Are you serious? Women in engineering. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L.A. (1988). Cognition and affect in evaluations of stereotyped group members. Paper presented at the Science Weekend session on Social Cognition and Memory. Convention of the American Psychological Association, Atlanta, GA.

Jackson, L. A. (1987). Cognition and affect in stereotyping and intergroup behavior. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, Charlottesville, VA.

Jackson, L. A., Hansen, R. D., Hansen, C. H. & Sullivan, L. A. (1987). Gender stereotypes and attributions: A Bayesian analysis. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New York, NY.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A. & Rostker, R. (1987). Gender, gender role, and body image. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New York, NY.

Hymes, J., Sullivan, L. A. & Jackson, L. A. (1987). Gender differences in emphasis on quantity and quality of performance. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New York, NY.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1987). Cognition and affect in evaluations of male homosexuals. Fourth Invitational Conference on Sex and Gender, Nags Head Conference Center, Nags Head, NC.

Jackson, L. A. & Sullivan, L. A. (1986). Limits to the ingroup favorability bias in the minimal intergroup situation. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Jackson, L. A. & Grabski, S. V. (1986). The influence of gender and occupational gender-linkage on perceptions of fair pay. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A. (1986). Gender-related factors in distributive justice behavior. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A. (1986). Age stereotypes among the young and the old: Implications for evaluations of individuals. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Society for Research in Life-Span Development, Akron, OH.

Jackson, L. A., Sullivan, L. A. & Hymes, J. (1985). Body image and gender role. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Jackson, L. A. (1985). Self concept and gender role: An open-ended inquiry. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Los Angeles, CA.

Jackson, L. A. & Hymes, R. W. (1985). Race, gender, and outgroup polarization. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A., Hall, C. & Hansen, R. (1985). A Bayesian analysis of the effects of gender stereotypes on attributions for skill-based performance. Paper presented at the Second Invitational Conference on Sex and Gender, Nags Head Conference Center, Nags Head, NC.

Jackson, L. A., Hunter, J. E. & Messe, L. A. (1984). Gender similarities in reward allocations: Subjects, partners, and tasks. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Card, A. L., Jackson, L. A. & Stollak, G. E. (1984). Gender role and person perception accuracy. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Jackson, L. A., Hymes, R. W. & Gorenflo, D. (1984). Gender, race, and social categorization: Evaluations of ingroup and outgroup members. Paper presented at the First Invitational Conference on Sex and Gender, Nags Head Conference Center, Nags Head, NC.

Jackson, L. A., Hunter, J. E. & Messe, L. A. (1984). Reward allocations in mixed-sex dyads: The bases of equality. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Jackson, L. A. & Cash, T. F. (1984). Gender-related variables in person perception. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

MacCoun, R. J., Kerr, N. L. & Jackson, L. A. (1984). Target gender as a moderator of the perception of traditional and liberal sex role attitudes. Paper presented at the meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Hymes, R. W. & Jackson, L. A. (1984). Social categorization and evaluations: Gender, recall, and the in-group polarization effect. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Baltimore, MD.

Jackson, L. A. (1983). Sex, attractiveness, and sex role in occupational treatment discrimination. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Anaheim, CA.

Jackson, L. A., Ialongo, N. & Stollak, G. E. (1983). Another look at parental antecedents of sex role development. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Anaheim, CA.

Stollak, G. E., Jackson, L. A. & Ialongo, N. (1983). Sex role orientation and child caregiving. Paper presented at the meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Detroit, MI.

Blanck, P. D., Reis, H. T. & Jackson, L. A. (1979). The effects of verbal praise on intrinsic motivation for sex-linked tasks. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, New York, NY.

Jackson, L. A. & Reis, H. T. (1978). Sex differences in reward allocations: Subjects, partners, and tasks. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

Jackson, L. A. Rivera, A. N., Gaes, G. G. & Tedeschi, J. T. (1977). The attribution of attractiveness and its correspondent inferences. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Hartford, CT.

Jackson, L. A. & Rivera, A. N. (1976). Further examination of the transgression-compliance relationship. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Rivera, A. N., Jackson, L. A. & Chilenski, G. M. (1976). Impression management and prosocial behavior. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

 

 

 

Invited Presentations

Jackson, L. A. (2012). Technology-mediated learning in pre-school children. Capital Area Community Services (CACS) Head Start Program, Lansing, MI. April 10.

Jackson, L. A. (2011). IT and child developmental outcomes. International Conference on Social Science, Social Economy and Digital Convergence (IC-SSSE-DC'11), Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain, May 27-29.

Jackson, L.A. (2011). Internet use and reading skills in low-income children. Conference on "iGeneration: Learning and Teaching in the Digital Age." San Francisco, February 17-19, co-sponsored by the Stanford School of Education, the UC Berkeley Cognitive Control Lab and the UCSB Neuroscience Research Institute. Audience (500) K-12 educators.

Jackson, L. A. (2011).  International Conference on Social Science, Social Economy and Digital Convergence. .Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain, May 27-29, 2011.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A. & Games, I. A. (2011). Videogame playing and creativity: Findings from the Children and Technology Project, National Social Science Association Workshop, Seattle/Victoria, July 31-August 3.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Perceptions of parent behavior and children’s information technology use. ED-MEDIA 2011--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications.  Lisbon, Portugal, June 27-July 1.

Jackson, L. A. (2011). Internet use and reading skills in low-income children. Conference on "iGeneration: Learning,Teaching and the Digital Age" Conference co-sponsored by the Stanford School or Education, the UC Berkeley Cognitive Control Lab and the UCSB Neuroscience Research Institute. The audience (500) mainly K-12 educators and some college professors. San Francisco, CA, February 17-19.

Jackson, L. A., Witt, E, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A. & Zhao, Y. (2011). Parent behavior, children’s technology use and creativity: Videogames count but parents don’t! Proceeding of the World Scientific Engineering Academy and Society (WSEAS) & Circuits/Systems, Computers and Communications NAUN International conference and Included in ISI/SCI Web of Science and Web of Knowledge. Corfu Island, Greece, July 1-5.

Jackson, L. A.  (2011). The Children and Technology Project. Meeting of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI. February 1.

Jackson, L. A. (2010). Internet, videos and children: Relationships with academic performance and morality Social Media Seminar Series, Department of Telecommunications, Information Studies, and Media. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, September 23.

Jackson, L. A. (2009) Internet, videos and children: Relationships with academic performance and morality. Seminar series: Human-Computer Interaction Institute. Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. Sara Kiesler, Sponsor. August, 26. 

Jackson, L. A., Fitzgerald, H. E., von Eye, A., Witt, E. A., Zhao, Y. (2008). Children and Technology Project. NSF-HSD 0526064. Cognitive and Moral Effects of Information Technology (IT) Use. Connecting with Youth in a Media-Rich World Conference, Michigan Virtual University, Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, East Lansing, MI, October 12.

Jackson, L. A. (2008).  Cognitive effects of IT use: Is Internet use and Videogame playing helping or hurting children's academic performance? Brown Bag Colloquium, Cognitive Neuroscience Interest Group, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, November 16,

Jackson, L. A., (2008). Reaching economically disadvantaged youth. Invited presentation at the 21st Century Skills Program: A Michigan Perspective. Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, Sponsored by Ricki Chowning, Executive Director, Regional Educational Media Center Association of Michigan, Jeffrey Dole, Associate Principal, Capital Area Career Center, Ingham ISD, Cynthia M. Heath, Supervisor, Division of Technology and Information Systems, Detroit Public Schools, Jill Knoll, Education Research Consultant, Office of Career and Technical Education, Michigan Department of Education. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, January 21.

Jackson, L. A. (2007). Adolescents and the Internet. Workshop titled “The Changing Portrayal of American Youth in Popular Media.” Annenberg Public Policy Center, Rancho Mirage, CA, March 2 -3.

Jackson, L. A. (2006). Home Internet Use in Low-income Families: Antecedents, Consequences and Research-in-Progress. Northwestern University. School of Communication, Technology and Social Behavior, Northwestern University, Invited Speaker Series, March 31.

Jackson, L.A. (2005). Does the use of information and communication technology (ICT) have a “democratizing effect” on children in East Asia and the United States?  East –West Center Research Program Seminar, East –West Center, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, January 20.

Jackson, L. A. (2004). HomeNetToo: A longitudinal study of low-income Internet users.  Second Annual Usability and Accessibility Conference.  Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, Michigan State University, Oct 26-27.

Jackson, L. A. (2004). Issues of academic integrity in online learning environments. MSU Virtual University Design and Technology (vuDAT) Breakfast Series on Online Pedagogy and Best Practices: Adventures in Online Teaching and Learning, Main Library, Michigan State University, October 13.

Jackson, L.A.  (2004). HomeNetToo: Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and Internet use: Explaining the digital divide and the Internet paradox. National Science Foundation Information Technology Research meeting of Principal Investigators. Hyatt Regency, Crystal City, Arlington, Virginia, June 9-11.

Jackson, L. A. (2004). The HomeNetToo project.  Keynote address.  Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society Induction Ceremony.  Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, April 15.

Jackson, L. A. (2003). The HomeNetToo project. Presentation on Capitol Hill sponsored by the American Psychological Association's Public Policy Office, Washington, DC.  Exhibition/reception sponsored by the Coalition for National Science Funding  (CNSF) hosting members of Congress and their staffs to learn more about the variety of stellar research funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), June 17.

Jackson, L.A. & von Eye, A. (2002). Antecedents and consequences of home Internet use in low-income families: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work. (CREW), School of Information. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, November 26.

Jackson, L., Barbatsis, G., von Eye, A., Biocca, F. A., Zhao, Y. & Fitzgerald, H. E. (2002). Trust and the Internet: Findings from the HomeNetToo Project.  Michigan State University Extension Conference, Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, East Lansing., MI., Oct.  15.

Jackson, L. A. (2001). Psychology and the Internet: Causes and consequences of technology use.  Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, May 2.

Jackson, L. A. (2001). Expanding your curriculum with on-line learning. Michigan Association of School Boards, Annual Fall Leadership Conference, Grand Rapids, MI, October 20.

Jackson, L. A. (2001). Expanding your curriculum with on-line learning. Michigan Association of Secondary School Principals, Grand Rapids, MI, November 28.

Jackson, L. A. (2001). AP Psychology 101 Online.  Faculty Seminars on Instructional Technology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, December 19.

 

Media presentations

Newspaper/Magazine/Journal Interviews and Publications:

Detroit Free Press. August 26, 2005. MSU to study tech impact on kids. Mike Wendland, Reporter.

The State News. September 9, 2005. $750K awarded for psychology research. Kristen Daum, Reporter.

Lansing State Journal. September 18, 2005. Study evaluates kids, technology. Matthew Miller, Reporter.

Boston Globe. February 14, 2006. Digital divide and the impact of Internet use on low-income children. Maggie Jackson, Reporter.

Psychology Today. September 13, 2006. Benefits of Internet use for children. Katie Gilbert, Reporter.

Congressional Quarterly Researcher. June 11, 2006. Effects of children’s Internet use. Marcia Clemmitt, Reporter.

Monitor on Psychology. November, 28, 2007. Feature article: Children and the Internet. Erika Packard, Reporter. American Psychological Association.

The State News. November 28, 2007. The Children and Technology Project. Joseph Terry, Reporter. Michigan State University.

Wired Magazine. December 1, 2007. Positive and negative effects of children’s computer use. Erica Westly, Reporter.

New York Times. April 30, 2008. The Children and Technology Project. Motoko Rich, Reporter.

Newsweek. July 23, 2008. How the Internet is influencing human cognition. Emily Anthes, Freelance Science Writer.

Sydney Morning Herald. July 25, 2008. How broadband and associated technology is changing the lives of children, for better and for worse. Sherrill Nixon, Reporter.

Detroit News. October 15, 2008. Youth’s cell phone camera use and implications for disseminating pornography. Marisa Shultz, Reporter.

Flint Journal. February 6, 2009. Interview on youth’s inappropriate use of cell phones – Why, when, who? Shannon Murphy, Reporter.

Wall Street Journal. March 10, 2009. Technology Section. How do morals translate offline to online? Andrew LaVallee, Reporter.

Detroit Free Press. March 25, 2009. Videogames and academic performance. Feature section. Megha Satyanarayana, Reporter.  

The State News. March 26, 2009. Videogames, cell phones and academic performance: Some good news. Joseph Terry, Reporter.

New Scientist. September 21, 2010. Virtuality and morality.  Samantha Murphy, Freelance Reporter.

The State News. December 9, 2010. Texting in class – a problem? solutions? Summer Ballentine, Diversity Reporter. Michigan State University.

American Psychological Association Website. January 4, 2011. Internet use has both pros and cons for children.

The State News. January 11, 2011. The pros and cons of students’ use of Wikipedia. Lauren Gibbons, Reporter. Michigan State University.

The State News. February 21, 2011. Children and videogames. Laura Fosmire, Reporter. Michigan State University.

Beverly Hills Times Magazine. February 21, 2011. Children’s use of technology. Stephen Takowsky, Publisher.

MSU Report. August 31, 2011. Parent’s behavior linked to kids’ videogame playing. Featured expert.  Michigan State University.

Nintendo of America. November 3, 2011. Video games help with creativity in boys and girls. Golin Harris, Reporter.

Medical Daily. November 11, 2011. Creativity and video game playing linked. Article# 237091. http://www.medicaldaily.com/news/20111102/7748/video-games-video-game-linked-with-creativity-video-game-playing-connected-with-creativity-are-y.htm

Yahoo. November 11, 2011. http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/technology-blog/research-shows-videogames-stimulate-kids-imaginations-211309645.html

Le Monde de I’Intelligence. December 1, 2011. Benefits of IT for learning. Sabine Casalonga, Science Journalist.

USA Today. December 2, 2011. Creativity and videogame playing. Mike Snyder, Technology Reporter. http://content.usa.com/communities/gamehunters/post/2011/11/research-video-games-help-with-creativity/l

VanCouver Sun. December 2, 2011. Videogame playing and creativity in children. Lindsay Marquette, Johnson, Reporter.

Scholastic News. December 4, 2011. Video games tied to creativity. Science Advisory Board. Natalie Smith, Senior Editor, Edition 5.

Jackson Citizen Patriot, MI. December 18, 2011. Technology effects on adolescents. Holly Klaft, Reporter.

Mlive. December 11, 2011. News for parents about the benefits of video games. http://www.Mlive.com/Lansing-ews/index.sff/2011/11/surprise_parents_video_games_g.html.

Times of India. December 11, 2011. http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2011-11-03/parenting/30354141_1_videogames-games-computers-in-human-behaviour-entertainment-software-association

Montreal Gazette, Windsor Star and others Canadian newspapers. December 15, 2011. Hardcore videogame players think less of their parents.

Wall Street Journal. March 5, 2012. When gaming is good for you: Hours of intense play change the adult brain; Better multitasking, decision-making and even creativity. Section on Life and Culture: Health and Wellness. Robert Lee Holt, Reporter.

Berlingske, National Danish Press. March 13, 2012. Included in a series of articles to appear in Berlingske about computers, videogames and learning.  Rasmus Palludan, Journalist.

Le Monde de l'Intelligence.  April 2, 2012. Brain changes induced by video games. Éditio Mondéo, Journalist.

Oregon Daily Emerald. April 16, 2012. Positive effects on the brain of playing video games. Josephine Woolington, Reporter.

Microsoft Corporation. May 25, 2012. Day-long interview and taping about videogame playing and creativity research (video available). Moriah Barth, Avenue Films, Production Associate, Moriah@Avenue-Films.com.

The State News. October 24, 2012. How college students or younger people use social media when reacting traumatic events. Rebecca Ryan, Staff Reporter. Michigan State University.

MSU Today. February 7, 2013. Social network use reflects East-West disparity. Andy Henion, Media Communications. Social Science, Education, Business. Michigan State University. http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2013/social-network-use-reflects-east-west-disparity/

Radio and TV appearances:

NPR. July 29, 2003. Future Tense.  New research on information technology use effects children’s development. Los Angeles, CA.

KCBS. July 29, 2003. Children’s use of computers: How does it affect their development? San Francisco, CA.

Channel 10 News (WILX). July 30, 2003. Tonight. Lansing, MI.

Home TV Channel. Michigan, July 31, 2003. Meridian Township.

KSL. August 4, 2003. Should children use computers? Salt Lake City, Utah.

WWJ. August 6, 2003. The Children and Technology Project at MSU. Detroit, MI.

CKNW/Corus Network. August 10, 2003. How using information technology influences children. Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

Science Central. September 19, 2003. News providers for ABC and CBS.

KCSN. September 14, 2003. New research on the effects of information technology use on child development. Northridge, CA.

WDIV. August 15, 2005. Computers use may have academic benefits for children living in poverty. Frank McGeorge, Reporter.

WKAR. August 25 2005. Children’s technology use. East Lansing, MI.

NNNJ-950. August 30, 2005. Does computer use help academic performance for low-income children? Sandra McNeill, Reporter.

Michigan Radio. September 2, 2005. Today’s children use technology. Steve Carmody, Lansing, MI.

WCAR. September 17, 2005. Racheal Nevado, New research on the effects of using computers and other techonologies on children’s development.

CBC. August 9, 2006. Current children and the Internet. Jatinder Dhillon, Reporter. http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/index.htm

WJR. March 24, 2009. Lloyd Jackson, Program Host. Detroit, MI

WILS-1320. March 25, 2009. Floyd Marlson, Program Host. Capital City Recap. Lansing, MI.

KCSN 88.5. March 26, 2009. Mustafa Divan, Producer. Northridge, CA.

      http://www.wlns.com/story/15941207/study-video-game-players-tend-to-be-more-creative

CBC. January 21, 2011. Walt Sorg, Program Host. As It Happens. Carolyn Morris, Interviewer. Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

WLNS. November 20, 2011. Videogames and creativity. http://www.wlns.com/story/15941207/study-video-game-players-tend-to-be-more-creative

Comcast Newsmakers. March 26, 2012. Children and videogames. Taped TV interview by Laural Hess, Newsmaker Host. Aired in rotation at  :54 past the hour on CNN Headline News and Comcast’s Detroit market, Trista Sutton, Producer.

WILS-1320. February 2, 2013. Mike Cohen, Program Host. Capital City Recap. Lansing, MI

 

Research Productivity Summary Statistics:

Career Publications (up to 2013): 96

Career Citations (up to 2013): 3023

Career Citations Excluding Self-citations (up to 2013): 2854

Average publications/Year (2008-2012): 3.8

Average Citations/Year (2008-2012): 286

 

Workshops:

Technology Facilitator (2012). Capital Area Community Service (CACS) Head Start Program, March.

Presenter (2007). NSF Catalyst Grant Workshop for Developing an NSF  Science of Learning Center Grant Proposal, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, Pensacola, FL, February.

Participant (2003). Department of Psychology, Michigan State University. Multicultural Initiative Workshop, Funded by a grant from the American Psychological Association, CEMRRAT, November.

Presenter (2003). Children and Internet use: Findings from the HomeNetToo project. Invited workshop on the domestic impact of information and communication technology. Sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Estes Park, CO. June.

Participant (2003). Trends in demographics and information technology affecting visitor center use. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.  March.

Presenter (1998). Race, gender and instructional technology. Workshop sponsored by Longman Publishers and the Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, April.

Presenter (1998). Using technology in teaching: Opportunities, challenges, and lessons learned. Sponsored by the College of Social Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, February.

Participant (1998). Student Instructional Rating System forms. Faculty-student government forum. Sponsored by the Office of the Provost, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, March.

Presenter (1992). Incorporating issues of diversity into curriculum and research: Help from the sociobiological perspective. Curriculum enhancement workshop sponsored by the College of Social Science, Michigan State University. September.

 

Consulting/Public Service:

Founder (2004), Member: Board of Directors Member (2004 – present). Information Technology Empowerment Center (ITEC) – Lansing, MI. Kirk Riley, Executive Director. www.ITECLansing.org.

Consultant, One Economy. (September 2004 - December 2005). Evaluation of One Economy’s Battle-Creek Digital Strategy, funded by the W. F., Kellogg Foundation.

Consultant (June, 2003). Expert panel on rehabilitation training to assist the visually impaired. Jonathan G. Tubman, Ph.D., Co-Investigator, Department of Psychology, Florida International University.

Consultant (March 2003). National Park Service. Imagining technology for National Park Visitor Centers of the Future. Great Falls, MD.

Member (December 2002 – present). Center for Research on Learning and Technology, Michigan State University, Yong Zhao, Director. The Center serves as the intellectual home to initiatives that explore innovative uses of information and communication technology (ICT) in learning.  The Center provides conceptual leadership and support for research, development and teaching efforts that investigate the interplay of technology, education and learning.   

Member (2002 – present). Teachers for a New Era (TNE) Project, Urban School Team, Michigan State University, Barbara Steidel, Project Manager. TNE is an initiative sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation to engage arts, social sciences, and science faculty, education faculty and K-12 staff in a fundamental review and revision of teacher preparation in focal areas.

Member (2008  - present). Multicultural Initiative, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, Fred Leong, Director. The purpose of the intra-departmental initiative is to positive the department to better respond to the changing demographics of both U.S. and the discipline of psychology, particularly in the areas of faculty recruitment and retention, and the training of graduate and undergraduate students in the area of multicultural issues and perspectives.

Consultant (2002). Imagining the Future (ITF) Project. ITF is an Internet2 project sponsored by Advanced Network & Services (ANS), Inc., a non-profit organization focused on accelerating the use of computer network applications and technology. The objective of the ITF project was to explore students' imagined uses of advanced digital technologies (i.e., robotics, PDAs, wireless, haptic devices, wearable computing, 3D gaming environments, user interfaces, virtual and augmented reality, visualization software). Students in 5 states (California, Hawaii, Michigan, New Jersey, Virginia) engaged in a variety of activities using current technologies and systems to inspire exploration of new technologies and galvanize the creative process to imagine what future learning systems and supportive technologies might look like. Principal investigator - Amela Sadagic, ANS.

Consultant (2002). Feasibility study to examine the need for a usability center at MSU. Funding provided by the Provost's office to University Outreach. Lead investigators: Hiram Fitzgerald, Diane L. Zimmerman and Burt Bargerstock. The usability testing laboratory will incorporate focus group research facilities, a multimedia conference center and possibly a business center. September 2002. A Usability Center has since been established in the Kellogg Hotel and Conference - MSU Usability & Accessibility Center, Sarah J. Swierenga, Director. http://usability.msu.edu/

Consultant (2001). Research proposal titled "Carpe Diem: Seize the Day."  Innovations in University-Community Collaborations. Project to provide high-risk middle-school children with access to computer technology for science learning. Partners: MSU Extension Office, Kalamazoo Consultant, Communities In Schools (KCIS) NexTechs program, Kalamazoo Public Schools. Elizabeth Fehsenfeld, Principal Investigator, MSU Extension, Pam Kingery, Director, Kalamazoo Communities in Schools (KCIS); Kelly Hiemstra, Children Youth and Families Youth Development Agent for MSU Extension, Erin Sharrard, 4-H Program Associate. Funding Source: MSU's Families and Communities Together Program.

Consultant (2000). Research proposal titled "Familial cardiovascular risk factors in an urban pediatric population: A survey of parental attitudes." (2000).  Principal investigators: Monica Global, MD, pediatric cardiology, Ihumoa Eneli, MD, pediatric cardiology, Claudia Holzman, epidemiologist, MSU Clinical Center. Assisted in the development of a survey to assess parents' readiness to change high risk behaviors (smoking, diet/obesity, physical activity). The survey will serve as a tool for pediatricians and family physicians to increase awareness of parental modeling effects on their preschool children's heart-healthy behaviors.

Consultant (1997). WDIV TV, Detroit, MI. Paula Tutman. Effects of height on social and professional outcomes, March.

Consultant, (1995). Office of the Provost, Michigan State University. Development of an ethnic studies specialization at MSU: Identification of the optimal model for MSU from among existing ethnic studies programs nationwide; needs assessment at MSU (courses, faculty); soliciting faculty support for an ethnic studies specialization. Two summary documents submitted to the Provost’s Office.

Consultant (1995-1997). Fowlerville High School, Fowlerville, MI. Assessment of self-esteem, changes in self-esteem, and correlates of self-esteem in high school students over a 2-year period.

Expert Witness (1994). Cathy A. Pierson versus Bay City Public Schools, a public body, and George C. Charles, an individual, jointly and severally. September - December.

Expert Witness (1995). Zamarron versus Fulton Schools, Fulton Schools Board of Education, and Fred Cunningham, jointly and severally, March - May.

Consultant (1994). Xerox Corporation, Chicago, IL. Formal versus casual attire: Effects on employee reactions to management, work attitudes, and productivity. October.

Consultant (1994). Office of the Provost, Michigan State University. Development of an ethnic studies specialization at MSU: Criteria for course inclusion. May - December.

Consultant (1994). ABC Prime Time Live, Atlanta, GA. Physical attractiveness in the employment context: Who gets hired? May.

Consultant (1992). Fowlerville High School. Development, administration and analyses of a survey on gender attitudes, self-concept, and career and family plans. January – December.

Consultant (1990). Michigan State Department of Education: Development of "Employability profiles" for K-12. April.

 

Professional Activities:

Editor-in-chief: Journal of Communication Technology and Human Behaviors

Associate Editor: Computers in Human Behavior

Associate Editor: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies

 

Consulting Editor:

Journal of CyberTherapy and Rehabilitation

Journal of Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking

The Open Cybernetics & Systemics Journal

 

Reviewer:

Professional Journals or Panels

Computers in Human Behavior

Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking

Journal of Family Issues

International Journal of Human-computer Studies

International Journal of Learning Technology

Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 

Journal of Children and Media 

International Journal of Library and Information Science.

Computer-mediated Behavior  

Behavior and Information Technology

Children and Computers

IT and Society

Psychology of Women Quarterly – Distinguished Reviewer

Media Psychology

Human Ecology

Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Journal of Family Issues 

Developmental Psychology

New Media and Society

Social Psychology Quarterly

Journal of Applied Social Psychology

Special Digital Pathologies Issue of Journal of Educational Computing Research

Current Psychiatry Reviews

Social Forces

Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology

Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism

European Journal of Social Psychology

Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology

Social Science Quarterly

Journal of Psychotherapy and Rehabilitations

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

Journal of Applied Psychology

Pediatrics

Journal of Black Psychology

Sex Roles

Psychology of Women Quarterly

Psychological Bulletin

Social Cognition

Group Processes and Intergroup Relations

Evolution and Human Behavior

International Journal of Psychology

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

Basic and Applied Social Psychology

British Journal of Social Psychology

American Journal of Sociology

Sociological Perspectives

Psychological Reports

Perceptual and Motor Skills

Journal of Social and Personal Relationships

Psychology and Aging

American Journal of Community Psychology

Applied Developmental Psychology

 

Conferences, Conventions, Publishing Firms.

SIGCHI (Special Interest Group-Computer-Human Interaction, ACM, 2009 - 2013

ICIAW, 2013. International Conference on International Warfare. Denver, Colorado

IARIA, 2013. Digital World, Nice, France

Program review committee for INTERACT 2011, Lisbon, Portugal

Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

American Psychological Association Conventions

Midwestern Psychological Association Conventions

Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology Meetings

West Publishing

State University of New York Press

Brown and Benchmark

Addison Wesley Longman Publishing

Pearson Publishers

Psychology Press

Peacock Publishing

Houghton Mifflin Publishing 

Allyn-Bacon/Longman

Prentice-Hall

McGraw-Hill

Wadsworth Publishers

International Scientific Advisory Committee, Wessex Institute of Technology, University of Cadiz,             University of Bergen

CHI 2006, Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Montreal, Canada

National Science Foundation, Panelist, 8 instances

 

Honors/Awards/Evidence of International and National Recognition:

Invited paper, Special Issue, Youth, Internet and well-being, Amichai-Hamburger Yair, Special Issue Editor, Computers and Human Behavior, July 2011.

Spotlight professional, Continental Broadcasting Network, Inc. January 20, 2011.  It is a pleasure to inform you that the Editorial Department of CWW who spotlight professionals and executives in your area profiled you as a candidate and is awaiting your biographical confirmation. Our forum is renowned by professionals and executives who express continuous knowledge, experience and achievement in their industry or profession. http://www.cbrnalliance.com.

Global Citizenship: Custom Textbook for Globe Education Network schools, by McGraw-Hill, April 2011. The editors would like to include your paper, Linda A. Jackson, et al., "Does Home Internet Use Influence the Academic Performance of Low-Income Children?" The APA has granted permission and requires that we have the permission of one author.  May we have your permission to include the paper in this and all subsequent editions of the textbook? 2010 Excellence Award in Interdisciplinary Scholarship, Michigan State University Chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi. The Children and Technology Project, Spring 2010.

Invited paper, Special Section: "Children, Adolescents, and the Internet"; Susan Greenfield, Special Section Editor, Developmental Psychology, 2010, Vol. 42, No.3.

Outstanding Paper Award, IADIS e-Society 2009 Conference., Barcelona, Spain, February 25-28. Jackson, L. A., von Eye, A., Fitzgerald, H. E., Witt, E. A., & Zhao, Y. (2009). Videogame playing, cell phone use and academic performance: Some good news.

2009 NSF “Highlights.” The Children and Technology Project.

Member. Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, Michigan State University Chapter. April, 2004 to present.

Winner, Gordon Allport Award, Best Paper on Inter-group Relations, 2001, awarded by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues). Stephan, W. G., Ybarra, O., Bettencourt, A., Boniecki, K. A., Ervin, K. S., Jackson, L. A., McNatt, P., & Renfro, C. L. (2002). The racial attitudes of blacks and whites: An integrated threat theory analysis. Personality and  Social Psychology Bulletin, 28 (9), 1242-1254.

Teacher-Scholar Award, Michigan State University, January, 1986.

Outstanding Mentor Award, McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program, August, 1994.

Scholar of the Julian Samora Research Institute, Michigan State University, 1994-1995.

Lilly Foundation Teaching Fellows Program, 1996

Michigan State University Award for Contributions to Undergraduate Teaching, 1987.

Outstanding Mentor, Developing Research Expertise at MichiganState University (DREAMS program), August 1998.

 

Research Grants (since 1999):

 

Current (in force, 2013):

Jackson, L. A., Principal Investigator (PI) (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Owen, C. B., Co-PI (Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering) and Carlson, J. S., Co-PI (Associate Professor, Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education, Program Director, School Psychology Doctoral Program). (Funded, April 2012). Using technology to increase core competencies in reading, science, technology and mathematics in Head Start children. Schultz Grant, Office of the Provost, Michigan State University. Total Costs: $20,000. Current status (November, 2013): Data collected and analyses completed. Final report to be submitted to the Provost’s Office on or before December 31, 2013.

 

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Owen, C. B., Co-PI (Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering) and Carlson, J. S., Co-PI (Associate Professor, Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education, Program Director, School Psychology Doctoral Program). (Funded, May 2012). Efficacy of computer technology in increasing kindergarten readiness in Head Start children. Dr. Gwen Andrew Faculty Initiatives Fund [FIF] Grant, College of Social Science, Michigan State University. Total Costs: $15,385. Current status (November, 2013): Data collected and analyses completed. Final report to be submitted to the College of Social Science on or before December 31, 2013.

 

Submitted (2012-2013):

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Owen, C. B., Co-PI (Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Carlson, J. S., Co-PI (Associate Professor, Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education, Program Director, School Psychology Doctoral Program), Fitzgerald, H. E., Co-PI (Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology). Using technology to increase core competencies and Kindergarten readiness in Head Start children. Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. R305A120381, Project Period, September 1, 2013 – August 31, 2015. Submitted, June, 2012. Total Costs: $1,349,088. January, 2013 - Declined.  

 

Owen, C. B., PI (Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Bohi, C., co-PI (Associate Professor, Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies), Games, I. A., co-PI (Assistant Professor, Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies) & Jackson, L. A., co-PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering). Using game design and social media to informally teach computer science and programming. DRL – Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings. Advance Informal STEM Learning Program (AISL). Proposal # 1056752. Overall rating – Very Good – Competitive (“Porting of successful IT learning game onto a social networking platform.)” NSF Status, September 17, 2010. “NSF encourages submission of a full proposal.”

 

Owen, C. B., PI (Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Games, I. A., co-PI (Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies), Lampe, C., co-PI (Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies) & Jackson, L. A., co-PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering). Using game design and social media to informally teach computer science and programming. DRL – Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings. Advance Informal STEM Learning Program (AISL). Proposal # 1114541. Project Period: September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2014. $1,364,762  (total costs). Declined.

 

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Heeter, C., Co-PI (Professor, Department of Telecommunication, Information and Media Studies, Founder and Director, Games for Entertainment and Learning Lab (GELLab, www.gel.msu.edu), Creative Director, Learning Design and Technology Services, Ratan, R., Co-PI (Assistant Professor and AT&T Scholar, Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies, Adjunct Professor, Educational Psychology and Educational Technology, Member, GELLab, O’Donnell, C. K., Co-PI (Assistant Professor, Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies, Member, GELLab and Carlson, J. S., Co-PI (Associate Professor, Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education, Program Director, School Psychology Doctoral Program). Optimizing video game playing to maximize STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) learning: An Ecological Systems Theory approach. NSF (National Science Foundation), DRL – Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings. Proposal # 1323310. Advance Informal STEM Learning Program (AISL). Submitted December 28, 2012. July, 2013 - Not approved. Overall Rating – Very Good. (Approximately 8% of 400 proposals submitted were funded).

 

Completed:

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Zhao, Y., co-PI (Professor, School of Education), Fitzgerald, H. E., co-PI (Associate Provost, University Outreach & Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology), Harold, R., co-PI (Professor, School of Social Work) & von Eye, A., co-PI. (Professor, Department of Psychology). An Ecological Systems Theory approach to examining the impact of IT use on children’s cognitive, social, psychological and moral development:The Children and Technology Project. National Science Foundation. Human Social Dynamics Program. Project Period: November 30, 2005 to November 30, 2011, $748,449 (total costs).

 

Kornbluh, M. & Rehberger, D. PIs (Director & Associate Director (respectively), Science of Learning Center (SLC) for the Humanities and Social Sciences), Spiro, R. co-PI (Professor, Department of Educational Psychology), Jackson, L. A. co-PI (Professor, Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Computer Science and Engineering), Biocca, F., co-PI (Professor, Department of Telecommunication & Media, Director, Media Interface and Networking Design laboratory (MINDlab)), Dyken, W., co-PI (Professor, Computer Science and Engineering). National Science Foundation Catalyst Grant. Project Period: September 1, 2005 to December 31, 2006, $150,000 (total costs).  

 

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering). Children, Parents and Information Technology Use. Families and Communities Together (FACT) coalition. Family Research Initiative. Michigan State University, Spring 2008, $2500 (total costs).

 

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Fitzgerald, H. E., co-PI (Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology), Zhao, Y., co-PI (Professor, School of Education), von Eye, A., co-PI (Professor, Department of Psychology) Biocca, F., co-PI (Professor, Department of Telecommunication, Information & Media Studies, Director, Media Interface and Networking Design laboratory (MINDlab)) & Barbatsis, G., co-PI (Professor, Department of Telecommunication, Information & Media Studies). HomeNetToo: Motivational, affective and cognitive factors and Internet use: Explaining the digital divide and the Internet paradox. National Science Foundation, Information Technology Research, Project #0085348, Division of Information and Intelligent Systems, Computation and Social Systems. Project period: September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2005. $1,532,739 (total costs).

 

Jackson, L. A., PI (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering), Eulenberg, J. B., co-PI (Professor, Computer Science & Engineering) & Fitzgerald, H. E., co-PI (Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology). The racial digital divide: Motivational, affective and cognitive antecedents and consequences of computer/Internet use. National Science Foundation, Division of Information and Intelligent Systems, Computation and Social Systems. Project period: October 1 1999-September 30, 2000. $79,201 (total costs).

 

Thornton, D. PI (Professor, Department of Psychology), Supanich-Goldner (Community Research Associate, University Outreach & Engagement), Melcher, J., co-PI (Community Research Associate, University Outreach & Engagement) & Jackson, L. A., (Professor, Department of Psychology, Adjunct Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering). LAPTOTTS: Learning Assisted by Parents and Teachers On Technology for ToS. Coalition for Children, Youth and Families, Michigan State University. Project period: September 1, 1999 to September 30, 2000. $50,000 (total costs).

 

Professional Affiliations:

ITEC- (Information Technology Empowerment Center) – Lansing, Founder and member of the Board of Directors and Program Committee.

AECT – Michigan Chapter, Association for Educational Communications and Technology Interdepartmental Program: Center for Multicultural Psychology Research

The National Academic Networking Association, ICIW 2012, International Conferences on Internet and Web Applications and Services

National Association of Professional Women

Faculty Row

American Psychological Association

American Psychological Society

Society for Experimental Social Psychology

Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology

IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)

Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education

Association for Computing Machinery

Society for Computers in Psychology

International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS)

International Scientific Advisory Committee, Internet and Society, Wessex Institute of        Technology, UK and Bergen Universities, Norway

iACToR: International Association of CyberPsychology, Training, and Rehabilitation

National Social Science Association (NSSA)

Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society

 

Planned Activities (2014 -  ):

(I) Information Technology Empowerment Center (ITEC) – Lansing (ITECLansing.org): Continue participation in the research component, program development and program evaluation at ITEC, focusing on technology-based Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) learning in this after-school program aimed primarily at middle-school children in an urban area. In addition, I will invite long-standing collaborators at ITEC and MSU (identified later) to be co-Investigators in this proposal.

Overview of the Planned Proposal: While our previous research has focused on computer-based learning, new technologies have emerged to render the “sitting” computer in the classroom or home, albeit with Internet connectivity, almost obsolete. Two related innovations call for research attention to demonstrate their effects on learning, in general, on STEM learning, in particular, and on other developmental outcomes (e.g., social and psychological outcomes). They are the tablet/pad and the cell phone. Both are mobile devices which have the potential to extend learning beyond the classroom (i.e., the blended classroom), home or any geographic location or time. What makes mobile devices especially attractive to educating youth is that they transcend socio-economic barriers and the digital divides encountered by earlier technologies, such as the home computer. I and potential co-investigators (identified later) will conduct a series of studies to examine the effects of mobile devises on cognitive, social, psychological and moral development in middle-school children. Experimental research will make available to groups of children the latest mobile technology “loaded” with learning applications (in one study), the latest blended classroom experience (in a second study), and “edutaining” (educational and entertaining) specifically designed for this research (in a third study) . Developmental outcomes, including STEM learning, will be measured in these experimental/intervention groups and compared to control groups not provided with the respective technologies. The guiding objective of this research is to determine the efficacy of new technology in increasing STEM learning and interest, learning and motivation to learn, in general, social behavior (e.g., friendships, peer relationships, parent relationships) and psychological well-being. Potential co-PIs, all of whom I have well-established collaborative relationships from previous research projects and proposals, are well-qualified to conduct this research (e.g., games-for-learning (serious games) design expertise, developmental psychology expertise, expertise in technology- and STEM-focused programs for middle-school children).

Potential Co-Investigators: Hiram E. Fitzgerald, ITEC Founder and Advisor, Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University (MSU); Kirk Riley, ITEC Executive Director; (Ivan) Alex Games, member,  ITEC Board of Directors, former MSU faculty member (Assistant Professor, Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies, until 2010) currently at Microsoft, Inc, Carrie Heeter, Professor, Department of Telecommunication, Information and Media Studies, Founder and Director, Games for Entertainment and Learning Lab (GELLab, www.gel.msu.edu), Creative Director, Learning Design and Technology IT Services and Robbie Ratan, Assistant Professor and AT&T Scholar, Department of Telecommunications, Information and Media Studies, Adjunct Professor, Educational Psychology and Educational Technology, Member, GELLab.

Potential Funding Sources:

(1) Institute of Education Science (http://ies.ed.gov/):National Center for Education Research (http://ncer.ed.gov): Education Technology Topic http://ies.ed.gov/funding/ncer_rfas/edtech.aspThis topic supports research that applies advances in technology to education practice. The long-term outcome of this research will be an array of education technology tools that have been documented to be efficacious for improving learning in education delivery settings from prekindergarten through high school, adult education programs (i.e., adult basic education, adult secondary education, or adult English literacy programs), or developmental (remedial) and bridge programs serving underprepared college students. The Education Technology topic was first competed in FY 2008 to highlight the Institute of Education Science’s support for research on technology to improve student outcomes and has funded 25 projects to date, covering a broad array of education issues in reading, writing, math and science, tied together by the innovative use of technology. Most projects focus on developing new interventions for students, ranging in age from prekindergarten through high school students.”

(2) National Science Foundation.

(a) Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST). Directorate for Education & Human Resources Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings.

The ITEST program through research and model-building activities seeks to build understandings of best practice factors, contexts and processes contributing to K-12 students' motivation and participation in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) core domains along with other STEM cognate domains (e.g., information and communications technology (ICT), computing, computer sciences, data analytics, among others) that inform education programs and workforce domains. The ITEST program funds foundational and applied research projects addressing the development, implementation, and dissemination of innovative strategies, tools, and models for engaging students to be aware of STEM and cognate careers, and to pursue formal school-based and informal out-of-school educational experiences to prepare for such careers. http://itestlrc.edc.org/

(b) Cyberlearning: Transforming Education. Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering, Directorate for Education & Human Resources, Directorate for Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences, Office of Cyberinfrastructure.  Through the Cyberlearning: Transforming Education program, NSF seeks to integrate advances in technology with advances in what is known about how people learn to better understand how people learn with technology and how technology can be used productively to help people learn, through individual use and/or through collaborations mediated by technology; (1) better use technology for collecting, analyzing, sharing, and managing data to shed light on learning, promoting learning, and designing learning environments; and (2) design new technologies for these purposes, and advance understanding of how to use those technologies and integrate them into learning environments so that their potential is fulfilled. Of particular interest are technological advances that allow more personalized learning experiences, draw in and promote learning among those in populations not served well by current educational practices, allow access to learning resources anytime and anywhere, and provide new ways of assessing capabilities.

 

 

 

(II) Head Start Program – Lansing, MI:

My research in the Head Start Program – Lansing, MI, was supported by two Michigan State University Research Initiatives, the Schultz Grant (Office of the Provost) and the Gwen Andrew Grant (College of Social Science). Although our initial effort to obtain external funding was unsuccessful, three changes are cause for optimism about future efforts. First, the combined results of the Schultz and Gwen Andrew Grants are now available and together provide a much stronger case for external funding. Second, two new proposals, discussed next, are under development that are more innovative (albeit more resource intensive) than the initial proposal. Third, request for proposals (RFPs) based on the recent Report of the National Assessment of Educational Progress – 2013, suggest that new resources are available to fund research on technology use in early childhood education.

       The first Head Start proposal, described next, will address the controversy surrounding the Head Start Program since the Head Start Impact Study and Follow-up, 2000-2012. Final Report was released in December 21, 2012 (http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/resource/third-grade-follow-up-to-the-head-start-impact-study-final-report). The second proposal will address the efficacy of a specific category of technology, video games, in developing core competencies, both academic (reading, mathematics, science) and social (social skills, negative and positive social interactions (aggression and cooperation, respectively) in preschool children. If video games prove to be effective, this research will go on to identify those components of video games that are responsible for their beneficial effects.

Overview of Planned Proposal # 1: The proposed research is a longitudinal study of the combined effects of participation in the Head Start Program and the use educational technology in the context of that program on core competencies, both academic (reading, mathematics, science) and social (social skills, negative and positive social interactions (aggression and cooperation, respectively)) in Head Start participants from preschool through 3rd grade.

       The report of the Third Grade Follow Up to the Head Start Impact Study (September, 2012) sparked controversy about the long-standing Head Start Program and the continuation of Federal funding for this Program by suggesting that the benefits of participation “flatten” by third grade (see Appendix 1). Although this suggestion has been vehemently challenged in public discourse, these challenges have largely been without empirical support. Moreover, there is no reason to doubt the validity of Impact Study’s results, which were obtained in research sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which contracted a reputable private research group, Westat, to conduct the study.

       However, the Head Start Program of today differs from the Head Start Program of 2000, used in the Impact Study, in a number of significant ways. Most importantly, teachers, parents and children participating in today’s Head Start Program are citizens of the Digital Age. Concerns about the digital divide that once excluded low-income families in the U.S. from access to technology, in particular, to home computers, have long been resolved, although socio-economic status differences in the nature of technology use are still in question (see publications and presentations presented earlier in this document). Given existing and ample evidence that the Head Start Program is effective in increasing core competencies, and evidence that using technology can increase core competencies in pre-school children, the next steps are to determine whether today’s Head Start Program, embedded in the Digital Age, increases core competencies needed not only for Kindergarten readiness but also for success in the Kindergarten through 3rd grade classroom (i.e., contrary to the suggestion based on the Impact Study Follow Up Report) and whether the use of technology in the Head Start classroom Hcontributes to long-term benefits (i.e., through the third grade) of participation in the Program.

       To accomplish these objectives two groups of Head Start classrooms will be followed for a 4-year period (i.e., from the beginning of their Head Start participation, typically at age 4, through the 3rd grade) – a Control Group and an Intervention Group. Each group will consist of 10 classrooms from the CACS Head Start Program (i.e., 20 classrooms, approximately 300 preschoolers, assuming 15 preschoolers/classroom). Participants in the Control Group will be observed for five days at the end of each month during Year 1 (i.e., 8 times) to obtain measures of “typical” technology use in today’s Head Start classroom (e.g., frequency and nature of use and whether technology use is an integral part of classroom activities). Measures of core competencies during Year 1 will be those routinely obtained by the CACS Head Program (i.e., the Developmental Growth Record, which measures both academic and social core competencies). In Years 2 -4 (i.e., Kindergarten through 3rd Grade), measures of core competency will be state-mandated measures and teacher ratings required by local school district. These measures will be obtained at the end of Kindergarten, 1st grade, 2nd grade and 3rd grade.

       The second group, the Intervention Group, will be provided with weekly technology-based learning activities during their participation in the Head Start Program. These learning activities will come from a set of activities, to be identified by the researchers, that are freely available online and are therefore have the potential to be used in Head Start classrooms nationwide, should they prove to be effective (i.e., increase core competencies). The same set of measures of core competencies obtained for the Control Group will be obtained for the Intervention Group.

Potential Co-Investigators: In addition to co-PIs for the Schultz Grant, Charles B. Owen and John S. Carlson, two additional researchers, both of whom I have collaborated with in the past, will be invited to participate the development of this proposal:  Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology, MSU and Yong Zhao, Presidential Chair, Associate Dean for Global Education, College of Education, Professor, Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership, University of Oregon.

Potential Funding Source: National Institute of Education Sciences (http://www.ies.ed.gov/ ), National Center for Education Research (http://www.ies.ed.gov/ncer/ ), Department of Health and Human Services. http://ies.ed.gov/funding/pdf/2014_84305A.pdf.  Early Learning Programs and Policies Topic. “This topic supports research on the improvement of school readiness skills (e.g., pre-reading, language, vocabulary, early science and mathematics knowledge, social skills) in pre-kindergarten children (i.e., three- to five-year-olds) and the development of core competences in early childhood. The long-term outcome of research supported by this topic should include an array of tools and strategies (e.g., assessments, instructional approaches, programs, and policies) that have been documented to be effective for improving core competencies.”

Overview of Planned Proposal # 2: The proposed research will examine the benefits of playing video games to the development of core competencies, both academic (reading, mathematics, science) and social (social skills, negative and positive social interactions (aggression and cooperation, respectively), in Head Start children. If video game playing proves to be beneficial, then the components of games that are responsible for beneficial effects will be identified. The outcome will be a set of guidelines for the development of edutaining (educational and entertaining) video games for preschool children.

   New research on the effects of video game playing has challenged the conventional belief that game playing is harmful to children, resulting in such negative outcomes as increased aggression and decreased self-regulation (research by Anderson, Gentile and colleagues since 2004).  Instead, video game playing may have no effects or even positive effects, depending on a variety of factors (e.g., age of players, type of video game). For example, a recent study (November, 2013) of 11,000 youth in Britain found no effects whatsoever of video game playing (Games and Learning, http://www.gamesandlearning.org/2013/11/15/game-play-has-no-negative-impact-on-kids-uk-study-finds/ ). Positive effects have been found in research cited earlier in this document (creativity, Jackson & Games, 2012) and by numerous others (e.g., speed of decision-making, visual-spatial skills).  A review of the research which was published in November, 2013, concluded that video games provide learning, health and social benefits to children (Science 2.0, http://www.science20.com/news_articles/video_games_provide_learning_health_and_social_benefits_review_finds-125179). And in an article to appear in the American Psychologist, one of the leading journals in the field, results of a meta-analysis of previous research led the authors to conclude that video game playing has a variety of benefits to children, including academic (school performance) and social benefits (interactions with peers), especially for children who are disadvantaged in these domains. Taken together with a wealth of evidence that children are, on average, self-motivated to play video games and prefer this activity over many others, it is time to bring video games to center stage in the education of today’s youth.

       Games to be used in the proposed research will be “Serious Games,” a game genre that has been the focus of the research activities of potential co-Investigators for this proposal, indicated later. The research will be conducted in 20 classrooms of the CACS Head Start Program, 10 serving as the Control Group and 10 as the Intervention Group (approximately 300 preschoolers (assuming 15 preschoolers/classroom)). Participants in the Control Group will be observed at the end of each month during Year 1 (i.e., 8 times) to obtain measures of “typical” technology use in today’s Head Start classroom (e.g., frequency and nature of use and whether technology use is an integral classroom activity). Participants in the Intervention Group will be provided with a set of video games at the beginning of each month during Year 1 (i.e., 8 times) and, like the Control Group, will be observed at the end of each month to obtain measures of technology use (including and excluding video game playing). The video games to be used in this research will be developed by co-PIs who have well-documented expertise in the development of edutaining (educational and entertaining games). For both groups, measures of core competencies will be those routinely collected by the CACS Head Program (i.e., the DGR, which measures both academic and social competencies). Findings from this research will have implications for the design of software applications for use in Head Start classrooms nationwide.  

Potential Co-Investigators: In addition to co-PIs for the Schultz Grant, Charles B. Owen and John S. Carlson, the following researchers, all of whom I have collaborated with in the past, will be invited to participate the development of this grant proposal:  Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology, Carrie Heeter, Professor, Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media, Founder and Director, Games for Entertainment and Learning Lab (GELLab, www.gel.msu.edu), Creative Director, Learning Design and Technology IT Services, Ivan (Alex) Games, Microsoft, Inc., Yong Zhao, Presidential Chair, Associate Dean for Global Education, College of Education, Professor, Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership, University of Oregon and Frank Biocca, Newhouse Endowed Chair Professor, Telecommunication, Director, Newhouse School’s MINDLAB (Media Interface and Networking Design Laboratory).

Potential Funding Source: National Institute of Education Sciences (http://www.ies.ed.gov/ ), National Center for Education Research (http://www.ies.ed.gov/ncer/ ), Department of Health and Human Services. http://ies.ed.gov/funding/pdf/2014_84305A.pdf. Educational Technology Topic. “This topic supports research that applies advances in technology to education practice. The long-term outcome of this research will be an array of education technology tools that have been documented to be efficacious for improving learning in education delivery settings from prekindergarten through high school, adult education programs (i.e., adult basic education, adult secondary education, or adult English literacy programs), or developmental (remedial) and bridge programs serving underprepared college students.”

 

(III) Invited Chapter: Tentative title: The relationship between videogame playing and creativity: Why videogame playing increases creativity and its potential for increasing other desirable cognitive as well as social outcomes. To appear in Videogames and Creativity, Garo Green and James C. Kaufman (Eds.), part of the Research Frontiers in Creativity book Series, Academic Press.

 

(IV) Book: Jackson, L. A. (Ed.) Introduction to Techno-psychology: A new sub-discipline within Psychology. Techno-psychology is an inherently interdisciplinary sub-discipline that best resides within the discipline of Psychology. It encompasses theory and research on the effects of living in a technology-rich world on the development of cognitive, social and behavioral outcomes. Among the specific technologies subsumed by Techno-psychology are the Internet (e.g., search engines, pornography, social networking sites (SNS)), e-mail, cell phones (voice and text messaging), tablets and pads/pods, new mobile devices and videogame playing (e.g., benefits (creativity) and liabilities (aggressive behavior)). The Introduction to Techno-psychology will summarize existing research and develop recommendations for future research, thus providing a comprehensive framework for understanding human development in the Digital Age.

The following are potential chapter contributors to this volume, all of with whom I have well-established collaborative relationships (co-PIs on NSF proposals, co-PIs on NSF-sponsored research, co-Investigators on University research initiatives, co-participants in NSF-sponsored workshops, co-participants in Annenberg Foundation-sponsored workshop and edited volume, cross-cultural research collaborations and journal publications, invited talkds) and each of whom can make a unique contribution to the book. In the interest of space, a description of the expertise of each potential contributor outside of MSU is limited to 3 sentences (information about MSU potential contributors is available on University websites). A visit to their web pages will reveal the magnitude of the contribution that each has made to the newly emerging field that I have designated “Techno-psychology.”

At Michigan State University:

Hiram E. Fitzgerald, Associate Provost, University Outreach and Engagement, Distinguished University Professor, Department of Psychology.

Carrie Heeter, Professor, Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media, Founder and Director, Games for Entertainment and Learning Lab (GELLab, www.gel.msu.edu), Creative Director, Learning Design and Technology IT Services

Robbie Ratan, Assistant Professor and AT&T Scholar, Department of Telecommunications, Information Studies and Media, Adjunct Professor, Educational Psychology and Educational Technology, Member, GELLab.

Casey O’Donnell, Assistant Professor, Department of Telecommunications, Information Studies and Media, Member, GELLab.

John S. Carlson, Associate Professor, Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Special Education, Program Director, School Psychology Doctoral Program.

Charles B. Owen, Associate Professor, Computer Science and Engineering.

Anne Marie Ryan, Steve Kozlowski, Kevin Ford, Rick DeShon or an individual or subset of these members of the Organizational Psychology Interest Group, Department of Psychology. Ranked the Number One Program by the US New and World Report and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), 2003 – present.

 At the University of Oregon:

       Yong Zhao, Presidential Chair, Associate Dean for Global Education, College of Education, Professor, Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership. Published more than 20 books and 100 articles, the most recent being Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization. Developed computer software, including the award-winning New Chengo/ZON (http://enterzon.com), the world's first massively multi-player online role-playing game for studying Chinese.  https://education.uoregon.edu/users/yongzhao; yongzhao@uoregon.

At Syracuse University:

Frank Biocca, Professor, Communications, Director, Newhouse School’s M.I.N.D. Lab, part of a network of collaborative research labs for scholarly work in communication, cognitive science and human-computer interaction. World Class University Professor at Sunkyunkwan University in Seoul, South Korea. http://newhouse.syr.edu/faculty-staff/frank-biocca; fbiocca@syr.edu

At Microsoft, Inc.

      Ivan Alex Games, Senior Project Manager: Learning and Engagement (Design of game-based online learning curricula and communities, reputation management, social endorsement, certification, and learning incentive systems. Educational Design Director: Designing and implementing the overall education and enrichment strategy for Microsoft. Researcher and designer of interactive UX with extensive background in optimizing user experiences by studying the psychological and socio-cultural implications of design for user learning and performance. Experienced in software development and QA both industry and academic R&D projects, with emphasis on driving design and development of learning platforms and assessment systems that blend play and learning. http://www.linkedin.com/pub/alex-games-ph-d/5/108/12a  alex.games@gmail.com

At Carnegie Mellon University:

      Sara Kiesler, Hillman Professor of Computer Science and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII). Applies behavioral and social science methods and thinking to technology design, especially to understanding how technologies challenge existing social and work behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations. Current projects are (1) Organization Science of Science; (2) Collaboration; (3) People and Robots; (4) User Perspectives on a New Internet. Google Scholar Citation Count = 31,629 (since 2008 = 13,271). http://scholar.google.com/citations?sortby=pubdate&hl=en&user=8Qu_gAMAAAAJ&pagesize=100&view_op=list_worksS. http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~kiesler/index.html kiesler@cs.cmu.edu   

      Robert Kraut, Herbert A. Simon Professor of Computer Science and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII). Tepper School of Business, Center for the Future of Work, Heinz School. Research on the design and social impact of information technologies in small groups, in the home, and in organizations. Development of group members shared mental models of each other, tasks to perform, goals, and environment to facilitate coordination in laboratory and field settings and in groups as diverse as research collaborations, managerial teams, military crews at NORAD, pick up groups in World of Warcraft and software development teams.  http://kraut.hciresearch.org  robert.kraut@cmu.edu

At the London School of Economics

      Sonia Livingstone. Professor, Department of Media and Communications. Author or editor of 17 books, numerous academic articles and chapters and editor of editorial board member for several leading journals. Director, 33-country network, EU Kids Online, funded by the EC's Safer Internet Programme, Director, The Class, part of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Connected Learning Research Network, Participant, European COST network, Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies, Leader, ECREA's Children, Youth and Media group, Executive Board - UK's Council for Child Internet Safety. Visiting professor, Universities of Bergen, Copenhagen, Harvard, Illinois, Milan, Paris II, and Stockholm, President of ICA (the International Communication Association)

http://www.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/whoswho/academicstaff/sonialivingstone/sonialivingstone.aspx s.livingstone@lse.ac.uk

At Southwest University, Chongqing City, China

      Jin-Liang Wang, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Research collaborator on cross- cultural research projects (China and the U.S.). Lead author or co-author on publications resulting from this collaboration. wangjinliang09@gmail.com

(V) Cross-cultural research: Continue research with Jin-Liang Wang, Southwest University, China, on young adult’s uses and consequences of using Social Networking Websites in China, a collectivistic culture, and the US, an individualistic culture. Initiate new research on videogame playing and its cognitive (e.g., creativity) and social consequences for youth players (middle-school children) in the two cultures. Re-examine gender differences and the interaction between gender and culture (observed in our previous research) on videogame playing (i.e., frequency and nature) and its consequences (cognitive, social, psychological and moral development).