Sample Language Arts Lesson
Daily Lesson Plan

Name:
Grade Level:
Laura Casper-Teague
3rd grade

Overall Lesson Topic/Title:
A Lesson in Comprehension, Using Main Idea, Sequencing Activities, and Writing Responses. Linking Literature to the Core Democratic Value of Diversity (Social Studies theme).

Goals/Objectives:
Students will be introduced to the Core Democratic Value of Diversity. Students will be able to identify the definitions of vocabulary words diversity, tolerance, uniqueness, and respect on a teacher created worksheet. Each student will be able to recognize the beginning, middle, and end of a story by completing an activity that has them order the events of the story. Students will be able to identify the main idea of a story by reading a list of choices on the worksheet and then choosing the most appropriate choice to best represent the main idea of the story. Students will respond to a writing prompt and support their response with a “why” statement. Students will verbally discuss their results and ideas within a group setting.

GLCE(s):
Comprehension
R.CM.03.01: Connect personal knowledge, experience and understanding of the world to themes and perspectives in text through oral and written responses.
R.CM.03.02: Retell the story elements of grade level appropriate narrative text and major idea(s) of grade level appropriate informational text with relevant details.
R.CM.03.04: Apply significant knowledge from what is read in grade level appropriate science and social studies texts.
Metacognition
R.MT.03.02: Plan, monitor, regulate and evaluate skills, strategies, and processes to construct and convey meaning (e.g. Decode unknown words, use graphic organizers to deepen understanding of problem and solution and organizational pattern.

Materials and Supplies Needed:
1 copy of the book , The Memory Coat by Elvira Woodruff
Pencils
Paper
Worksheet: vocabulary, story sequence, main idea, journal entry.

Procedures and Approximate Time allocated For Each Event:

Academic Demands: Upon completion of the lesson, students will have a better understanding of the concept of diversity. There are many different people in the world that have experienced hardship, but there are common traits that people share that connect different groups to each other. Students will be introduced to the concepts of diversity, uniqueness, culture, family, and friendship. The students are beginning to make the transition from concrete thoughts to more abstract ideas. The students are aware of personal differences they have from other students. The lesson seeks to identify unifying traits that groups share such as family bonds, friendship, community, traditions, holidays, culture, etc. The idea is to enhance ideas of tolerance, respect, and diversity and to link these concepts to how the United States was founded and continues to thrive as a place where different groups can live in harmony with one another. The teacher will close the lesson by reviewing the vocabulary and having the students briefly retell the sequence of events in the story. The students can use their completed worksheet as a guide to respond.

Social Demands: Students are expected to sit quietly and listen to a story that will be read aloud to them. The students will raise their hands to offer suggestions and to participate in the lesson at appropriate times as requested by the teacher. Before beginning the lesson, the teacher will explain what is the expected behavior for the lesson. A student will be given one warning to get back on task or to be quiet and listen before being asked to leave the group and to finish the lesson independently with supervision provided by another adult. The writing activity prompt will be written on the overhead and the teacher will ask the students for suggestions of an appropriate response for the writing prompt. The response will be extended by asking the students to respond with a “why” statement that will extend their answer to the original writing prompt response, “I would make the world a better place by...” The idea is to get the students to think more abstractly than just answering the question.

Linguistic Demands: The “Myself as a Learner” assessment provided information to develop the lesson around the students' generally preferred learning styles. The students sometimes like to be read to, but there was not an overall consensus on the preference for writing activities. Prompts will be given by the teacher during the writing activity to spur students' ideas and to assist them to make connections from the characters in the story to their personal lives. The lesson will provide assorted opportunities for students to express themselves. They will be read to, they will respond verbally, in writing, or by drawing pictures in response to the prompts.

Introduction:

The lesson will be introduced by asking the students if they have noticed that in America there are all different kinds of people and that we live together peacefully most of the time. The students will be asked if they know what the word diversity means. The teacher will write down the students' responses and verbally prompt when necessary. Additional vocabulary of tolerance, uniqueness, and respect will be introduced and the students will be asked to suggest definitions for the terms. The teacher will hand out a worksheet that lists the vocabulary and the definitions. The teacher and the students will chorally read the definitions of the vocabulary that is written on the worksheets. The book The Memory Coat by Elvira Woodruff will be shown to the students. The teacher will explain to the students that at different times throughout history people have had to flee their homelands to save their lives. The teacher will explain that the book The Memory Coat tells the story of one Russian family that journeyed to America to start a new life. America would be very different from Russia and the family would experience many people that are like them and many people that are different from them (diversity). The teacher will ask the students to pay attention to the teacher as the story is read aloud to them. This part of the lesson will last 10-15 minutes.

Key Events

An introduction and discussion of diversity. The story The Memory Coat by Elvira Woodruff will be read aloud to the class by the teacher. The students will have a worksheet that contains the vocabulary that was discussed before the story was read. The vocabulary list will have the definitions listed on the worksheet. This will last 10-15 minutes.

The worksheet will have a sequencing activity that will be completed after the story has been read. There will be five elements taken from the story and the elements will be mixed up. The students will be asked to put the story events in the correct sequence of occurrence from the story. This will be done as a group activity as the teacher reads the choices. The students will raise their hands to make a suggestion for the correct sequencing order. This part of the lesson will last approximately 5-7 minutes.

The worksheet will have a question that asks the students to identify the main idea of the story. The choices will be read to the students and students will raise their hands to suggest their choice of the most appropriate answer for the main idea. Students will be asked to explain why they made their particular choices. There will be four choices that the students can choose from to identify the main idea. This part of the lesson will last approximately 5-7 minutes.

The students will be given a writing prompt that begins with “I would make the world a better place by...” They will then be asked to follow up their statement with a “why” response that supports their opinion. This part of the lesson will last 10 minutes.

The lesson will be closed by a quick review of the story elements, vocabulary, and personal reflections. The students will be asked to share their responses with the class. The worksheets will be collected for later assessment by the teacher. This part of the lesson will last 5-10 minutes.

Outline of key events:

1. Introduction: A discussion about how there are all different kinds of people in America (diversity) and that we live in peace most of the time.
Vocabulary definitions defined orally by students.
2. Choral reading of vocabulary.
3. A reading of "The Memory Coat" by Elvira Woodruff.

4. Worksheet:

Choral reading of vocabulary.

Sequencing activity.

Main idea.

Writing prompt: “I would make the world a better place by...”

5. Extension of response with a “why” statement.
6. Closing: review of the story elements, vocabulary, and sharing of personal reflections.

The lesson will last from 40-50 minutes. Students will be expected to sit quietly, listen, and respond appropriately to the teacher's requests. Students will be given one redirect. A second warning involves asking the student to leave the group and sit quietly in another part of the room to complete the lesson.

Closing Summary for the Lesson:
The students will finish their writing prompt and be asked to focus their attention on the teacher. Students will be asked to volunteer their results for the story events (worksheet). The teacher will review the vocabulary by asking students to volunteer examples from their personal lives that help to explain the vocabulary. This may be difficult for the students, but it will help them make text to self, text to world, and text to text connections. The students will be given an opportunity to share their writing response statements with the class to help them make more connections. The teacher will then officially close the lesson by reiterating the events that took place during the lesson and quickly review the connections that were made.

Post Assessment:
The students will demonstrate that they are progressing in the lesson by completing the activities of the worksheet, offering personal responses to the activities and sharing their writing responses with the class. The teacher will gage interest by the level of disruption and lack of interest by the students. Problems that are perceived will be addressed in an impromptu manner to try to refocus the lesson. Suggestions from the CT and other interns during the lesson will be greatly appreciated and enacted to ensure the lesson is a successful learning experience for the students and the student teacher. The worksheets will be collected and reviewed for individual understanding and to provide insight to improve the lesson.

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